NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Abhishek Sharma

Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today, their opinions on the importance of free speech, their thoughts on creating their dream show and where imagination comes into play.

Abhishek Sharma, Associate Programming Director, Radio City 91.1FM India

NYF’s Grand Jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Abhishek Sharma, Associate Programming Director for India’s Radio City 91.1 FM.

Abhishek’s radio career spans over a decade with experience working with popular Indian Radio brands like the Radio City and Radio Mantra. His work has been awarded at the New York festivals, India Radio Forum, Golden Mikes, ACEF and Radio Duniya awards.

He has hosted and executed campaigns like Shukriya Soldier that was broadcasted globally including USA, India, New Zealand, Australia and UAE and was recognized by award competitions in India and abroad. His campaign Dil Deke Dekho was one of the most appreciated initiatives of (2015-2016) and was the most awarded radio campaigns of the year.

Organ donation kiosk during Radio City 91.1 FM Dil Deke Dekho

 

 

 

 

 

In the interview below Abhishek shares his insights on the shifts taking place in radio today, the dream show he’d love to create, and how imagination supplies an edge to radio.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Abhishek Sharma: Radio is under a transformation phase even right now, or rather I should say that it has moved ahead from being just about radio. With the rise of social media, its impact on the target group of each broadcaster has grown massively. Fortunately broadcasters around the globe have realized its potential and today radio content is processed in such a manner that it can be podcasted with a semi professional video on social media as well. Radio stations have verified twitter, insta and FB handles with fans requesting their music, chatting with the RJs and participating in polls. The RJs have moved on from being just “pleasant chatters on radio” to self opinionated superstars on digital media. Needless to say bringing about a revolution in terms of content, music is much easier than it was ever.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Abhishek Sharma: As far Indian radio is concerned I think we do need a content revolution. On comparing radio storytelling with cinema we see that new avenues/ genres are seldom tried via broadcasters. 90% of radio content in India still relies upon humor. I would not say that we don’t do meaning full radio but the core or route generally remains humour. Whereas cinema on the other hand has always been experimenting genres like action, politics, war, drama, sex, even disgust. I think with more and more exposure to the world media and internet broadcasters will actively do stuff that is revolutionary in nature.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Abhishek Sharma: I would love to be a part of a show that influences people not just in India but across the globe. A show that knows no boundaries, can helps people connect with loved ones in different corners of the world, take music and cultures from one part of the world to another.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theatre of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Abhishek Sharma: Imagination and theater of mind do differentiate/ provide an edge to radio from all other mediums like television or even films. The pictures built are more beautiful and relevant. A war scene is as deadly as budgeted  as a set for a TV series or film, it’s relevant to me because it’s a zone that I had created as per my imagination. A drama series on radio is more like reading a book where the story unfolds layer by layer, but the edge remains, the audio landscape makes it more and more believable and relevant.

To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Guy Starkey

Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the radio industry today.

We’ve interviewed our brilliant jury, all award-winner’s themselves and asked them to weigh in on how radio will evolve in the coming years, the changes in content creation, their “dream project” and freedom of the press.

Guy Starkey, Associate Dean, Global Engagement, Faculty of Media and Communication at Bournemouth University

NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of the industry’s most respected directors, producers, journalists, writers, educators, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. This esteemed jury selects the World’s Best Radio Programs from all the entries submitted from around the globe. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio?

NYF caught up with Dr. Guy Starkey, Associate Dean, Global Engagement, Faculty of Media and Communication at Bournemouth University and asked him to share his insights. Guy is a former radio producer and presenter on commercial radio in the UK, the British Forces Broadcasting Service in Gibraltar and stations in France and the Middle East, he still broadcasts daily on the internet radio stations 1540 The VOP and The Voice of Peace.

His books include ‘Local Radio, Going Global’, ‘Radio in Context’, ‘Radio Journalism’ (with Professor Andrew Crisell) and ‘Balance and Bias in Journalism: Representation, Regulation and Democracy’.

In the interview below Guy shares his thoughts on content, the evolving world of radio, freedom of the press, how imagination comes into play in radio and much more.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Guy Starkey: Radio is obviously maturing into a medium which is heard through different platforms and devices, which is seen as well as heard, and which has to square up to increasing competition in order to survive. One of the most remarkable things about radio in most markets is that, despite dire predictions of its impending demise, it has proven to be pretty resilient so far. In the UK 89% of the adult population who are 15 years old and above tune into radio in a week. I don’t want to say the word ‘still’ because we shouldn’t accept it’s going to decline in popularity. Radio has changed a lot since the 1950s when TV first came along, and it can evolve further to keep holding onto its audiences. In fact it’s nothing short of remarkable that radio has been this resilient, when you look at the big falls in newspaper circulation in recent years and how traditional TV has been affected by short-form interactive content through online platforms such as YouTube and on-demand subscription services like Netflix. Exactly which way radio is going to go is hard to predict, but stations should play to its strengths and realize that if it just sounds like an online music stream, it’s hardly in the right place to compete with the many real online music streams.

New York Festivals:  Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Guy Starkey: I’d say evolution, rather than revolution. There’s so much diversity in radio content that it’s difficult to claim everyone’s going in the same direction. In the UK it’s the slow but steady progress of digital audio broadcasting (DAB) that’s driving a real growth in the number of different formats. More and more new cars have DAB installed as standard here and the marketing talks about DAB because the market likes it. Last year a new national digital multiplex launched in the UK, bringing extra choice of music formats but most importantly new talk stations, like the business station Share Radio and the news and entertainment focused Talk Radio. TalkSPORT added TalkSPORT 2 and so on. Small-scale DAB has brought lots of local alternatives.

As so many entries in these awards demonstrate, what radio does that very few other media do well is great speech, so one step backwards has been our biggest brand BBC Radio 2 automating overnights. With their comparatively huge budgets it was a real shock they abandoned one of radio’s greatest assets, live speech. The BBC’s budget has been under attack recently for political and ideological reasons, so we have to hope there’s no more of this to come.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Guy Starkey: Maybe a show that gets people in different parts of the world talking to each other and understanding each other better. The BBC World Service already does this, but maybe it needs to be entertainment led in order to get bigger audiences. If budget’s no object, we could get some really big names to be in it – although I’m not a big fan of parachuting TV personalities into radio presentation roles. The two jobs are different and we’ve already got a lot of great talent in radio, thanks very much!

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Guy Starkey: Yes, of course the freedom of the press is important, but with it should come great responsibility. Too many press barons just use their newspaper titles to influence public opinion and change the course of history when it comes to elections and big-issue referenda like over Brexit, for example. So many lies and biased opinions were splashed across front pages and the ‘news’ pages during that campaign, no wonder a tiny majority voted to turn back the clock forty years and dig ourselves into an economic and political bunker – at a time when some really difficult geopolitical tensions are emerging. So, every time our press raise objections to the imposition of sensible regulation – not even on matters of political bias and impartiality – it reminds me that in the UK and many other countries it is the broadcasters who are already regulated and who have to take their responsibilities to tell the truth seriously. No reasonable commentator seriously claims the BBC is unable to carry out fearless journalism within the law simply because it is subject to regulation.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Guy Starkey: Radio can take its listeners to new and unfamiliar places simply by creating pictures in their minds. It’s not just words that can do that, but sounds too, carefully crafted together. A student once said me that radio can’t be any good, because there aren’t any pictures, unlike TV. If that were true, then the novel would have died out a long time ago!

To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Peter Cernik

NYF’s Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today, their opinions on the importance of free speech, their thoughts on creating their dream show and more.

Peter Cernik with his New York Festivals Bronze Trophy for "Both Sides Of Dying"

The 2017 TV & Film Awards Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Peter Cernik. Peter is a sought after producer, presenter, voice-over talent. For the past 20 years he’s worked on projects for BBC and BBC Scotland,  UKRD Northeast (Star Radio), and Bauer Media and more. From his early career in entertainment working his way up to manager of Butlan’s Ents Team by the age of 21, to his long time collaboration and freelance work with GMTV, to reporting from the

Broadcasting from the Arctic Circle

Arctic Circle to producing and presenting from Lapland, Peter’s versatility shines. Throughout his career, he’s racked up a trophy shelf full of Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards from award competitions including New York Festivals International Radio Awards, Community Radio Awards, SRA  and Charles Parker Awards.

In the interview below Peter shares his creative insights on the revolution in content creation, the biggest shift in radio that he’s noticed in the past year, his dream project, the importance of freedom of the press and much more.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Producing and Presenting in Lapland

Peter Cernik: This is the question on everybody’s lips and if I had an answer, I know I would be sitting at the top of some corporate radio franchise with a very big smile on my face. Over the last 10 years we have seen a dramatic change in the way radio is presented to its listeners, especially here in the UK. Be it the injection of the added podcast that brings the highlights and extra content to the download communities. To a step back from the disc jockeys, who at one time could interact and connect with its audience. But who now must sell random brands of unknown restaurant chains, within the one-minute allotted talk time. We have seen the boom of Internet radio, bringing to life the way community and hospital radios, connect with its communities, in a way commercial radio now fails to achieve. Then there’s the notorious rise and fall of the prank phone call, which at one time could lift a breakfast show to cult status. CDs were released that would sell in their thousands, with the host churning out more and more radio dribble as the pool of ideas got thinner and thinner. But by far the biggest shift in radio is the interaction that comes from instant online services. First it was MySpace, then Facebook, then it was Twitter and now no radio station worth its salt hasn’t got a social media manager who has the control of five or six different accounts across different platforms. Disc jockeys can create content online with more freedom than they can whilst on air. News teams can break stories within seconds, without even entering the studio. This new weapon within the radio industry’s armour, be it good or bad as dramatically changed the way we interact with our radio listening. It is a proven theory that young people no longer listen to radio, but who receive much of their radio content and information from online services. This can be well seen in the way BBC Radio One has invested so much capital and time into its online content, be it a backstage

Greg James and Taylor Swift

tour or a full on music video production with Greg James and Taylor Swift. The way radio uses social media will only get bigger and bolder as the years progress. We are already at the stage where disc jockeys’ can go live on Facebook, putting a face to a voice which to me has always been the mystery and fun about the whole experience. Some say that radio will be completely in our hands within the near future, we will be able to pick the voice, choose the playlist and create targeted adverts all from the comfort of our air-conditioned cars. Me personally I hope that this is just a phase, as I feel radio is a personal medium that should also be a shared experience. Yes I want the disc jockey to talk to me in my kitchen, to make me feel like a friend down the pub. But I also want to be able to still walk into a room and have that conversation about listening to an amazing radio show with other people, just as many of us do every day with TV broadcasts. Still one thing has always remained the same, as times have changed within the radio industry and that is the human voice. Let’s just hope that technology doesn’t take away the human aspect of this incredible medium.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Peter Cernik: It’s hard to say! Yes we have some amazing hitting audio being created across the world, from the likes of ‘This American life’ which boasts a 2.5 million download achievement with each episode. To the BBC’s ‘Short Cuts’ that takes audio off into its own identity. But is there a revolution? In the commercial radio sector I feel no. It’s still all about the adverts, sales, repetitive music playlists which has been around for quite some time here in the UK. As for worldwide radio, I would hate to make any type of bold statements simply down to the lack of listening time. But with the invention of the new Transnational Radio Encounters ‘Radio Garden’ app, which allows a listener to circulate the globe listening to new and exciting radio stations, I hope to be able to give you a better answer in the future. But I do hope more mainstream broadcasters take the time to look at some of the more interesting pieces of radio that are being created across the world with in community, student and hospital broadcasting. Tackling subjects that some broadcasters just shy away from, which I feel they truly miss out on some amazing revolutionary productions.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Peter Cernik: There are so many dream shows I would like to create, be it a full-scale drama to a mainstream children’s production. But at the moment I would like to use something quite personal to me to help educate and in a way entertain the listeners. I got into radio from a TV background due to having a condition called Cushing’s syndrome. Over the course of 10 years I had many brain operations and even had to have a rib removed to have my adrenals taken out. This has left me with quite an unusual side effect, I now have no ability to feel fear. This is left me with the fun title of ‘The man with no fear’,

"Fearless" Peter Cernik on a parachute jump

which was given to me by a UK national newspaper. This was then picked up on by the BBC, who then included my story into a science program. For this they had me abseil down a 400 foot tower, while a leading fear scientist studied my body outputs to determine if this was true of false. To everyone’s surprise except me, I showed no signs whatsoever of fear or stress. This brings me onto my dream program if there’s any broadcasters out there willing to take a chance. I want to travel the world hunting down other people with strange illnesses and side effects, trying to live in their shoes and experiencing what they go through on a daily basis. Maybe we could throw in a couple of challenges along the way. I know it needs work, but you did say any show with any budget.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Peter Cernik: Press freedom is a very strange thing, yes in most circumstances freedom of the press should always come first. But there are cases where, quite frankly the press should simply back off. We live in a world of nosy people, who need to know every detail about every star, politician and public figure. Which most of the time doesn’t actually have anything to do with the job or situation that the public have a right to know about. At times the press seem to take sides, almost creating a witch hunt that we the public and listeners or drawn into. This brings the ideology of press freedom into disrepute, yes I want to know what Donald Trump is signing and yes I want to know what our Prime Minister has achieved. But do I really need to know how much money Beyoncé spends on her kids. News should be ‘News’ and free to everyone. But when only 13% of the world’s population enjoyed a free press and 41% of the world’s population partly free press, leaving 46% of the population within a non-free media environment (according to freedomhouse.org). Do we really have such a bad deal and do we the listeners not drive the press in the way that they report. After all we listen in to the broadcasts, we buy the newspapers, we indulge in magazines and search online which many of us don’t have the ability to do. Everyone has a personal view on the subject of press freedom, which I might not always agree with. I do hope the world as a whole, will one day have the freedom in their media, which we take for granted.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Peter Cernik: Imagination is what it’s all about, if it wasn’t for audio landscaping and having the ability to conjure up your own inventions within your own little worlds, many of the radio productions today would fail. We may all listen to the same piece of audio, but the pictures we create as an individual will all change and interpolate in different ways. This is what makes radio and audio broadcasting such a personal medium. The visual side of audio is never really given to you, yes you may have somebody describing what they see or a familiar sound played to us all, but this still leaves us to interpret it in our own special ways. My winning entry from last year’s awards has had so many different interpretations, which have all been completely different to mine which I am so happy about. If it wasn’t for Orson Wells’s imagination and the audio techniques at the time. The Halloween production of ‘War the worlds’ in 1938 would not have frightened listeners in the way it did. Which had a lot to do with the way the audio created images unique to the listener’s imagination.

Orson Wells "War of the Worlds Broadcast"

And now as techniques and technology improves in ways that I am sure Orson Wells would have loved to use on that 1938 production, audio landscaping has grown into an art form of its own. And as a producer who is drawn to documentary and drama productions who uses audio, it makes me happy to know that my piece of work can inspire people’s imaginations in a way that only the listener can see. Please feel free to find out more about me at www.rentagob.me or on twitter at jordyuk.

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF’s Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Helen Shaw

Radio on Radio features insights and observations on the wonderful world of Radio by New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury members. NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Helen Shaw.

Helen Shaw accepting the 2016 Grand Trophy

Helen Shaw is founder and CEO of Athena Media, an award-winning transmedia company based in Dublin and Manchester. Ms Shaw, a multi-award winning broadcaster, earned the prestigious 2016 Grand Award in the History category for the documentary “The Kinder Letters” that captures a rare glimpse of post-war Europe through the microcosm of a children’s book. She is a former editor with the BBC and was previously MD Radio, RTÉ, Ireland’s public broadcaster.

Helen had this to say about Athena Media earning the Grand Award.

“To win the Grand Award for The Kinder Letters is quite incredible for us. We’re a small production house and it took us nearly two years to get the documentary made and to reach an audience. It is, at heart, a beautiful, human story – ultimately a love story – which allowed us to tell a much bigger story about post war Europe and the strange relationship between Ireland and Germany. The documentary is very much a team effort, but all credit has to go to the researcher and recordist Robert Hope who first met Tony O’Herlihy, the presenter and source of The Kinder Letters, in his German class, and

Helen Shaw and Tony O'Herlihy at the 2016 NYF Radio Awards

unraveled the story of the ‘danke’ book.”

In the interview below Helen shares her thoughts on the ever-evolving world of radio, the importance of freedom of the press, and what radio dream show she’d like to create.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Helen Shaw: Radio will continue to break free of its constraints of time, platform and location. Online radio and audio through podcasts is rapidly becoming how we find and share audio stories and we’re also now very used to the idea that great audio stories and shows also come from non radio businesses like the New York Times,the New Yorker and Audible. Journalism is back in vogue, (thankfully), and strong audio journalism is on the up given the ease of use in mobile phones. So my advice? Embrace podcasting more.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?


Helen Shaw: My big new listens this year are from the New York Times (The Daily) podcast and the New Yorker Radio Show. As someone based in Ireland trying to stay on top of events in the U.S. is critical and these two shows have been ‘must listen’ additions. I think both remind us of the need to support journalism and a free press. In many this the growth of audio storytelling and audio journalism has meant most great newspapers now have audio channels (as well as obviously some video output). In Ireland The Irish Times now produces magazine shows on a weekly business in both news and features and that level of competition between the traditional radio players and the new digital audio players is good for audiences. We’re definitely getting more choice but the critical factor in maintaining quality journalism and a free press is a strong business model for content. Podcasts are still free and that is challenging. Some, like Serial, have found strong sponsorship support, but that is still quite fragile in other countries and the concept of how we fund media is a vital debate and discussion for policy makers in any democracy. Increasingly public broadcasting models have to conform or face digital realities. In Uk and Ireland there is a TV license fee which covers public broadcasting but which bears little relationship with how audiences now use content, which is often non-linear and on smart phones. There’s a real need to re-open a global public discussion about not just the value of a free press in democracy but how we fund or pay for that social and political value.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Helen Shaw:  An online independent, trusted global podcast, coming out daily, with the strength and support of top quality journalists and editors, tackling one key story a day.

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com

 

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NYF’s Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Götz Naleppa

Radio on Radio features insights and observations on the wonderful world of Radio by New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury members. NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

Götz Naleppa, producer — sound artist

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Götz Naleppa, Drama Director & Sound Artist, Naleppa Audio Productions, Germany.

Götz Naleppa began his career as assistant director, working at the Schiller Theater in Berlin for 5 years during the directorship of Boleslaw Barlog. He has been a director and dramaturge in the radio drama department of RIAS active -Berlin. In the 1970s, he was instrumental in the development of the original radio drama and the art head radio play, working with George Tabori increasingly on actor-oriented directing. In the 80s, he turned his creative focus to musical and experimental radio play forms, and the radio art and sound composition.

In the 90′s he constructed  the radio play departments of Germany Radio (Cologne / Berlin) as a radio play director, and from  1997 to 2008 Mr. Naleppa acted as director and dramaturg for Germany Kultur (responsible editor for sound art). Since 2009, he has concentrated his talents on projects serving as a  freelance director (radio drama, media arts), translator and composer in digital sound art. Throughout his illustrious career, Mr. Naleppa has garnered numerous awards for radio drama productions  and multiple radio play of the month with international competitions including: Prix Europa, Prix Marulic, New York Festivals Gold Award, and Prix Italia.

In the interview below, Mr. Naleppa shares his thoughts on the evolution of radio, the importance of freedom of the press, his vision for his dream project and more.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Götz Naleppa: The actual tendency of time-shifted and mobile use of radio (mobile-phones, Internet, computers) will continue and accelerate. The radio stations who do not react to that tendency will be left behind. But I am not only happy about this all-time-availability of radio. It is to be paid by a deterioration of sound quality (mp3, compression) in art forms like radio play and sound art – and radio is in danger of losing its “secret,” its charm.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Götz Naleppa: Let’s not exaggerate: every new product nowadays is announced as a “revolution” in the industry. No, there is as much innovation in its content as this innovative medium showed in its whole history. Job as usual. But a GOOD job!

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Götz Naleppa: I would call my dream-show “Sound Artists United.” It would be a (at least!) 24-hours-show, where hundreds of the wonderful and creative sound-artists all over the world would find a space to present their crazy works. From all continents – in the only really international language that exists: SOUND!

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Götz Naleppa: Without freedom of press there is no free society. We were used to think that this fundament of freedom and democracy is in-existent or endangered in ideological states like communist or other authoritarian states. But in these days we observe a tendency against freedom of press even in the watch-tower of democracy, in the United States of America, unimaginable before. If truth is no longer a value, democracy and human rights are lost.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Götz Naleppa: Who works with radio, works with sound. And sound is magic. It touches our deepest regions, much more than vision. But magicians never tell HOW!

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Valerie Geller

Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today. NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

Valerie Geller,President of Geller Media International

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member and International Broadcast Consultant Valerie Geller, President of Geller Media International.

Ms. Geller works with top broadcasters in radio, TV, internet throughout the world, and has consulted on several award winning documentary films. As a content and story consultant, trainer and seminar leader, she uses proven methods she developed over years of working in 38 countries with over 500 radio and television stations. Geller coaches and trains on air personalities, programmers, producers and broadcast news journalists to become more Powerful Communicators, and she has worked with some of the top personalities in the world.

A former program director for (WABC, New York) and News Director  for (K101, San Francisco), Geller has been training broadcasters since 1991. Her clients in Europe have included LBC, The BBC, Australia’s ABC Sweden’s MTG, Sveriges Radio, SBC, YLE, P-4 Norway, NRK, Danmarks Radio, FM 100, and many many more. She has been named by Radio Ink Magazine – one of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Radio, and one of the world’s top consultants for radio, TV and film documentaries.

Her books have been translated into several languages and Geller’s fourth book: Beyond Powerful Radio – A Communicator’s Guide to the Internet Age for News, Talk, Information & Personality, Broadcast, Podcast, Satellite & Internet” was published by Focal Press in 2011 www.beyondpowerfulradio.com is available on Kindle or in paperback and on audible.com in audio book format.

In the interview below she shares her global view of how radio is growing, her dream project , and how imagination is at the core of radio.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Valerie Geller: Radio is growing on mobile and hugely growing in podcasts. Radio is no longer radio but rather audio media. It’s mobile, digital and global. The platform diversity is drawing younger audiences and that is exciting for radio.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Valerie Geller: I certainly wouldn’t call it a revolution but because the gate keepers are down and anyone can make a broadcast just as in the 90s anyone can do a blog with podcasting in new digital platforms, we are seeing a diverse city of content and lots of new voices. We’re always working and I tell this to my coaching clients throughout the world, is to tell the truth, make it matter, and never be boring. Storytelling works, Inside works, fascinating characters that people can relate to…works.  To be effective radio has to inform entertain, inspire, persuade, and connect audiences with their humanity. Humor works too.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Valerie Geller: My dream radio programs are based on finding and developing creative original personalities. When you find the right talent — fascinating compelling, people who are smart, and fun, with insight, curiosity, a good sense of humor and original thought — are articulate, not afraid and who take risks, those people are golden tickets to success.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Valerie Geller: The freedom of the press is vital. There’s no question. When you were in dark days, you must fight for the light and that includes every journalist and storyteller.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

The imagination is very very powerful. Radio is at core, the imagination medium. Radio has better pictures than television (or any video) because it taps into imagination. But today with digital media and mobile, video and pictures are expected. But if you close your eyes and describe things visually — and storytell powerfully, the imagination will take you on exciting and delightful journeys that you would never expect.

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Howie Sylvester

NYF’s Radio on Radio interview series features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s views on the transformation taking place in the radio industry today.

NYF’s international Grand Jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

Howie Sylvester, Patriots & Bruins Executive Producer, WBZ-FM98.5, The Sports Hub

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution ever changing radio landscape with 2017 Grand Jury member, Howie Sylvester. For the past 8 years, Howie has been the Patriots & Bruins Executive Producer at WBZ-FM98.5, The Sports Hub, the flagship Station of the Bruins, Patriots, Celtics & Revolution. Previously he was a Producer for Westwood One and his production background also includes stints at both WBCN and NHL Radio. Before moving to the production side, Howie served as an engineer at ESPN Radio.

In 2016 Howie earned the Silver NYF Radio Awards Trophy for “Too Many Memories: the Bruins-Canadiens Rivalry”  the documentary, produced to coincide with the NHL’s Winter Classic between the two teams, covers the most important events in the 90-year history of their rivalry. It aired repeatedly during the holiday season on the Bruins Radio Network’s flagship station, 98.5 The Sports Hub in Boston, which serves the Greater Boston area, southern New Hampshire and much of Rhode Island. The title references one of the most infamous events in the rivalry, when the Canadiens eliminated Boston from the Stanley Cup Playoffs in 1979 due to a too many men on the ice penalty assessed to the Bruins in Game 7 of their series.

In the interview below, Howie shares his thoughts on the how the delivery mode of radio has changed, his dream show, and why freedom of press is so important in this era of multiple sources.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Howie Sylvester: The mode of delivery will change; it already has to a great extent. More and more people are consuming our product on their mobile devices, and since very few of them have radio tuners, internet broadcasters have a real chance to be heard—the playing field is definitely being leveled. That said, content is still driving the bus. I produce live sports events, and that’s still programming that people will seek out.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Howie Sylvester: No, not that I’m aware of. I work on commercial terrestrial radio, and listen to a lot of satellite radio. I don’t hear a lot of innovation. I DO hear a lot of replication—what works in one market is copied in another, especially with the consolidation of radio companies—a successful morning show on a CBS station in Boston gets copied on a CBS station somewhere else.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Howie Sylvester:  I just did it! I interviewed a number of members of the 1976 New England Patriots for a documentary on that season. With all the success the franchise has had recently, many forget their first great team; one that came one questionable call from a potential championship. This is the 40th anniversary of that season, so we decided to remind New Englanders that there was a time when we DIDN’T expect to win the Super Bowl every year. I love working on documentaries, and I was very happy with the way this one came out.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Howie Sylvester: Just look at the headlines. There has never been a time in my recollection when a free press has been more important. End runs around the media designed to bypass the normal channels of delivery are nothing new, but true is still true and false is still false—it’s our job to tell the difference. The sheer number of sources today makes that job a little tougher, but we’ve got to make sure we don’t get lazy and report what’s spoon-fed to us.

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Robyn Ravlich

NYF’s Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today, their opinions on the importance of free speech, their thoughts on creating their dream show and much more.

NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

Robyn Ravlich, Writer and Independent Radio Feature Maker

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Robyn Ravlich, Australian writer and independent radio feature maker.

Robyn had a long and extremely successful career at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation as a highly-regarded producer and presenter across a range of innovative, specialist programs, including The Listening Room and Into the Music. She has collaborated with composers, performers, writers, sound artists and musicians to create unique radio works for these shows and mentored emerging radio creators and artists in residence.

Robyn has been honoured with international and national awards and broadcasts, receiving Silver awards at the New York Radio Festivals (Encountering Marina Abramović, Artist and Icon in 2016, Nora Guthrie, Her Father’s Daughter in 2013, Afterimages – Carol Jerrems Through a Lens in 2012, and Blind Tom – Slave Pianist Sensation in 2010) and Bronze for Diana Jones and her Appalachian Roots in 2014.

In the interview below, Robyn shares her insights and observations on the transformation of radio, the dream program she’d like to create, and how “the invisibility of radio has allowed magical illusions.”

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Robyn Ravlich: I’ve grown up in Australia, a vast country that has regarded radio, especially public service radio such as the ABC, as a vital good available freely to all. It is democratic in reach and spirit and has played a significant part in fostering understanding of our stories and histories, complex events and phenomena worldwide, as well as stimulating and enriching cultural life. It was wonderful to grow up in a remote mining town and be connected to a richness of ideas that emanated in airwaves faraway in big cities and were being experienced simultaneously by other listeners all over.

Radio managers increasingly speak of radio as we’ve known it (a common schedule of live and recorded programs broadcast to many at once, usually via terrestrial transmission) as ‘linear radio’; or ‘heritage radio’, implying old fashioned limitations. Flushed with the success of podcasts and spurred by the increasing ubiquity of social media usage, there is a rush to catch the attention of younger audiences who have not yet come to radio by a strategy that shifts intensively towards ‘digital radio’. Not so many years ago, that meant DAB (high quality sound delivery of existing and additional channels for special events and genres) for which the take up was generally underwhelming due to costs of the receiver sets and limited geographical coverage. Now it means radio delivery by smartphone or any internet enabled device, or more particularly, radio that is assembled by the listener from a preferred selection of podcasts and audio downloads.

On the positive side, this gives the listener a lot of choice if informed and able to negotiate the available offerings, rather like assembling mix tapes and collages. The old and the less dexterous and those without affordable data plans may find themselves disadvantaged if ‘linear radio’ winds down, or strips its program schedule to kick start digital-only offerings as has already begun. Content is the buzz word for the digital platform, rather than programs or shows or documentaries. Podcasts arose from radio (making programs available at a time that suits) and benefit from the link to the network’s skills base, reputation and resources. Ditto for podcasts that have emerged from quality newspapers and journals.

So, it’s a challenging time of change, some of it exciting, some of it problematic. The BBC looks to be vitalizing its radio offerings by making more of them available worldwide. I was saddened to see ABC RN simplify texture, tone and substance in its 2017 schedule by shedding most of its music programs, along with the playful Pocket Docs and aurally adventurous Soundproof.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Robyn Ravlich: In delivery method, yes, but not necessarily in terms of what is made and how. Shock jocks and state radio propaganda aside, the agenda of most considered radio is essentially humanist in orientation – exploring humanity past and present, shining light on dark deeds, sparking our imagination, providing context and meaning to events, ideas, and lives.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Robyn Ravlich: Radio is such an important outlet for musicians, writers and actors; and a creative medium of itself. So, my dream show is always going to involve creative

Patti Smith

collaborators. I have many dream shows, some rather elusive: one would involve Patti Smith (singer-songwriter, writer, photographer, artist) on an odyssey of her own choosing,but if it were mine it might be to travel with her to experience the Day of the Dead festival in Oaxaca, or to spend time with Bob Dylan, a common artistic hero. Another dream show would be to remake Under the Skin, a series of documentaries exploring race, ethnicity, immigration policy and multiculturalism that Stan Correy and I produced in 1980, as the subject is so hauntingly alive today.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Robyn Ravlich: Press freedom is vital in these turbulent times with populist insurgencies, exclusionist, anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies on the rise in many countries. Speaking truth to power is tough but necessary. It has been fascinating to see how tenacious the quality media has been in the US since the 2016 election, maintaining rigorous investigative and independent journalism in a new era of ‘alternate facts’.

Helen Boaden, outgoing BBC Director of Radio

I noted with interest that Helen Boaden, outgoing BBC Director of Radio (and formerly Director of BBC News), spoke at the 2016 Prix Italia about problems in journalism exacerbated by technological change – the fast and furious flow of television news tidbits, which lack overall context and, which online, frequently act as digital ‘click-bait’. She asked:

“Do we the media, do enough today, to explain and explore? Or are we too busy moving on to the next thing, in thrall to the pace of news?”

I was especially heartened by her plea for what she called the ‘slow’ medium, radio: ‘it should be encouraged to survive and thrive whatever platform we hear it on … context and explanation are its forte’.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Robyn Ravlich: Sounds – real or artificially conjured. Words – spoken actuality or written and performed. Put them together in a judicious way, taking account of texture, tone, rhythm and, above all, deeper meaning – and you have something to stir the listener’s imagination. For me, in radio and other creative art forms, truth and beauty are honorable companions.

From its inception, some writers and producers have understood that the invisibility of

"For me, in radio and other creative art forms, truth and beauty are honorable companions."

radio has allowed magical illusions, including magic carpet rides beyond borders, travel where it’s not otherwise possible to go – to other countries, other worlds, other times, past and future. An early German radio maker spoke of the ‘enchantment of radio’, something understood by Orson Welles in the Mercury Theatre’s dramatic presentation of The War of the Worlds – widely believed, generating panic and riots. Woman Found Dead by the Lake Shore, a Swedish Radio program, which I heard as a member of the NYF Grand Jury in 2014, was an exemplar of dramatically constructed storytelling. Based on a true crime case, its surreal Kafkaesque turns led to the revelation that the killer was a moose, not the victim’s husband.

To me, dreams (and crushed dreams or nightmares) are the natural materials for poetic radio making. In an era of compassion fatigue and information overload, my aim is to have listeners ‘feel’ what they are hearing, to experience ‘trembling moments’, to experience ideas and people’s remarkable stories of survival, creativity against the odds.

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Colin McGinnis

Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today, their opinions on the importance of free speech, their thoughts on creating their dream show and much more.

Colin McGinnis, Group Production Manager at UKRD

NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Colin McGinnis, Group Production Manager at UKRD, United Kingdom.

Colin’s creative production skills earned UKRD a Silver Trophy for his award-winning entry, “2015 In Review” and a Bronze trophy for “Armistice Day Tribute 2015” in the 2016  New York Festivals Radio Awards competition.

Colin bring years of experience to the jury, as both a composer and sound designer he has created multiple soundtracks  with BIG IDEA MUSIC & FOCUS MUSIC.  His skills as a voice over artist  led him to work on multiple projects with Wise Buddah, utilizing his well-crafted Aussie accent.

In the interview below, Colin shares his thoughts on how advertising is affecting radio, the importance of freedom of the press  and  his insights on the opportunities in curated content and the elements his dream project would include.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Colin McGinnis: I think it all comes down to advertising…. The almighty dollar, erm, pound. That’s why we are all here working in the industry. It’s a business and for good or ill, radio is much more of a refined business than ever before.

What we lose is aspects of creativity and for the vast majority of stations, an editorial perspective. But there’s something actually quite beneficial about that. If you take the reporting of news as a prime example, we are seeing a strong focus on telling the facts, and not the fiction. TV News has a lot to answer for with its sometimes overt bias. But radio, (for the most part) is neutral and that means we are reporting truth.

I also believe there is a greater need for local stations to de-centralise their services. If local radio wants to survive, it needs to be in the community and focus on what matters.

Station owners also need to see that local revenue is where the money is, and stop chasing national clients, who are far more interested in online advertising these days.

It’s not as glamorous, nor as much money, but think local…. support and help those local businesses.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Colin McGinnis: I think the revolution is yet to happen, but its coming. Listenership is more fragmented than it’s ever been and I don’t think we’ve dealt with that fragmentation fully.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Colin McGinnis: I would love to talk about this, but I am pitching something at this very moment so I’m limited to what I can say about it.

What I can say is that budget plays a big part in my pitch. In fact the budget will be very small.  I see an opportunity for shifting the dynamics of radio and taking a new and interesting path that steps away from regular presenters and shows, and head toward a bite sized approach to content. Our attention spans have diminished over the years, so we need to keep that in mind with content. There is a golden opportunity to do something unique here and ‘curated content’ is a phrase that’s constantly in my head.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Colin McGinnis: Any chance I get I will, but doing so in a way that allows the listener to make their own mind up.  It is difficult to bite your tongue sometimes and accept that you got to focus on the facts and keep your personal opinions out of it.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Colin McGinnis: It’s everything. I certainly never underestimate the power of music in storytelling. To me it’s a key factor to carving out the emotion you need to evoke.

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

 

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Maddy Fryer

NYF’s Radio on Radio interview series features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the radio industry today. Each week NYF spends a few minutes with our esteemed Grand Jury  members discussing such topics as the myriad of changes taking place within the radio industry, the importance of free speech, their thoughts on creating their dream show and where imagination comes into play.

Maddy Fryer, Executive Producer, PopAsia, SBS Australia

NYF’s  international Grand Jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Maddy Fryer, Executive Producer for PopAsia, SBS Australia. Maddy is a 10 year veteran of SBS Australia and SBS Radio is a bridge linking to the 4+ million Australians who speak a language other than English. Since 2010, Maddy has been the Executive Producer of SBS’s PopAsia, a digital radio station for young multicultural Australians.

Prior to working with SBS PopAsia, Maddy led the team from the program Alchemy SBS Radio’s national music, arts and talk program. Alchemy offers a subversive spin on traditional sounds and stories. In 2008, Alchemy earned 2 awards: the prestigious Silver New York Festivals Award and the NYF Silver United Nations Department of Public Information Award for their program the Stolen Generation in Australia.

In the interview below, Maddy shares her views on the effects of podcasts on radio landscape, the importance of freedom of the press, why  imagination is radio’s greatest asset.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Maddy Fryer: The strength and continued growth of podcasts has firmly put talks back on the radio map. Shows available as podcasts or vice versa has loosened the tie of broadcasting and created new ideas around content making. See this trend continuing to transform how we broadcast.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Maddy Fryer: Yes – so many people now rely on podcasts to get them thru a commute or as an escape from the world. The advent of ‘my time’ associated with listening to podcasts is definitely revolutionary.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Maddy Fryer:  If I told you….!

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Maddy Fryer:  Our world has changed dramatically with the continued growth of social media  – it feels like almost overnight that truth has somehow become compromised. The concept of a free press and trust in the media needs to be re-established – the connection has been lost. Finding a cut thru in the understanding of a free press is the only way a harmonious world can exist.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Maddy Fryer: Imagination is radio’s greatest asset. It’s the one thing that keeps such a strong connection with the audience. Imagination thru radio takes you to places you’ve never been before. To me that has always been the game changer and why radio is still growing strong.

The deadline to enter the 2017 World’s Best Radio Programs competition is March 17, 2017. To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

 

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