NYF Open Mic: Spotlight on Radio Educación’s Youth Radio Programming

New York Festivals celebrated the World’s Best Radio Programs℠ from around the globe at their annual awards gala in New York City on June 19th. NYF spent a few minutes with Lourdes Müggenburg – Producer and Max Müggenburg – Youth Commentator from Radio Educación Mexico.

Radio Educación’s Lourdes Müggenburg (Lulu) and Max Müggenburg took home the 2017 Silver Trophy for “We have homework” Sharing our Posada Festivity with our Radio-Listeners for Best Children/Young Adult Program.

Max and Lulu Müggenburg Radio Educación, Mexico

“We have homework!” was developed  because in Mexico there are more than 15 million children between the ages of 8 to 17  and there was not a show dedicated to children and teenagers where they could express their doubts, annoyances, emotions together with  listeners. The show preserves national traditions  and promotes feedback between the youth-presenters and listeners. “We have homework!” is moderated by a professional psychologist who encourages children to participate, while respecting the opinions  of others with tolerance and acceptance.

In the interview below, Lulu shares her insights on how and why Radio Educación’s  “We have homework!” program was created, her thoughts on why the show is so successful, the contribution the youth commentators add to the show, and much more.

New York Festivals: Why did Radio Educación create the program “We have homework!” and how long has this program been on the air?

Lulu Müggenburg: Radio Educación originally planned the show to guide parents to be able to support children with their  school homework. It was only after six months that we realized that our task was way beyond school homework, so we included a wide array of social themes. We also we decided to add children as commentators of the show.

New York Festivals: How did the producer (Lulu) cast the youth commentators?  How many youth commentators are on the team?

Lulu Müggenburg: It really seems it was a natural way that we choose our cast of commentators. I remember we had a contest on the show to find the best diaries submitted by the audience about their holidays. The six winners visited and they have been with us there on. We have 6 commentators today.

New York Festivals: Why is Youth Radio important and what do you think makes this show so successful?

Lulu Müggenburg: The Radio is magical. It reaches way beyond where I could have ever imagined. It allows people to develop their creativity and moves cords in every soul hearing behind the receptor.

New York Festivals: How often does the show run and how do you come up with the creative ideas for each show?

Lulu Müggenburg: “We have homework” is a weekly show. It has a different topic every week. It is an absolute joy to be able to create and produce a program all together. It much more a fun task than a job.

New York Festivals: How do you prep for your program?

Lulu Müggenburg: As a team, we brainstorm ideas for the show and come up with an agreement of our weekly topic and decide on a topic based on suggestions. We have an impressive amount of interesting people sending recommendations to us about  what to talk about on our radio show.

New York Festivals: What are the future goals for the show “We have homework!” and how do you plan to achieve those goals?

Lulu Müggenburg: We always have challenges, but it is amazing how there are always surprises on every show. The least expected aspect seems to be a bundle of joy for the audience and so on. It is with great happiness that I am able to produce such a gratifying radio show.

New York Festivals: How does it feel to earn the 2017 NYF Radio Awards Silver Trophy and what does it mean to your team and the radio station?

Lulu Müggenburg: The show “We have homework” and all its team is profoundly proud the NYF Radio Awards has acknowledged our effort, work, and dedication once more. Radio Educación also feels honored with this third award.

New York Festivals: In 2014, “If I were to be president, I would…!” earned the NYF Gold Trophy for Best Children/Young Adult Program; to what do you attribute your history of success?

Lulu Müggenburg: When we won the First Place for the program “If I were to be president…” it was as a result of  the in-depth preparation of each of the member individually and all of the team as a group…. the children commentators have applied to our show what they learned then: they are really focused on democratic aspects such as tolerance, freedom, choices….

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Program Awards, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/

 

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NYF Celebrates Outstanding Radio from Around the Globe

On June 19th, New York Festivals® International Radio Program Awards hosted the annual awards Gala at New York City’s Manhattan Penthouse.  Radio royalty from around the  globe gathered to celebrate the World’s Best Radio Programs℠ selected by the Grand Jury from entries submitted from 32 countries.

The evening kicked off with a cocktail reception  with some of the world’s most recognizable voices and captivating programming producers in the industry mingling with new friends and familiar faces followed by a seated dinner/awards presentation.

Prominent award-winning radio industry executives honored winners and presented award segments:  Mark Travis, New York Philharmonic USA; Joe Richman, Sarah Kate Kramer, Nellie Gilles, Ben Shapiro, Radio Diaries USA; Tim Desmond, RTÉ Radio 1 Ireland; Jennie Cataldo, BMP Audio USA; Sean Brocklehurst, Albert Leung, and Eric Van, CBC Radio One Canada; Jon Tjhia and Sophie Black, The Wheeler Centre Australia and Michael Green, Behind the Wire Australia and Clea Chang, Intelligence Squared USA.

Peter Woods, Current Affairs Editor accepting Broadcaster of the Year Award for RTE Ireland

The Grand Jury honored RTÉ Ireland with the prestigious title of Broadcaster of Year and TBI Media UK with Production Company of the Year.

RTÉ Radio Ireland was in the spotlight taking home the renowned Broadcaster of the Year Award for their illustrious achievements; this is the fourth time that RTÉ has been honored with this title. The network earned an impressive 10 Gold trophies, 8 Silver, 10 Bronze, and 12 Finalist Certificates.

TBI Media United Kingdom was in the winner’s circle earning the title of Production Company of the Year Award.

Phil Critchlow, CEO of TBI Media UK - Broadcaster of the Year

Three global companies earned the coveted Grand Award:

TBI Media United Kingdom, for for “World Cup ’66” for BBC Radio 2 & BBC Radio 5 live for their complex musical undertaking featured, a composed filmic soundtrack, played by 22 musicians throughout the 2 hour and 40 minute production.

DMC Studio Argentina, for “Blackout,” the compelling story of a blind person who describes a day of his life through sounds in Buenos Aires Argentina.

Diego Cannizzaro, DMC Studio Argentina Grand Award

Behind the Wire and The Wheeler Centre Australia for “The Messenger” for their ten-part podcast series based on thousands of voice messages sent via burner phone by Abdul Aziz Muhamat, a refugee detained on the Australian-run detention center on the Manus Island, Papua New Guinea to journalist, Michael Green.

The New York Philharmonic was in the winner’s circle. “Zubin Mehta at 80” was honored with a Gold trophy for Music and a Bronze for Best Director. “Celebrating the 175th Anniversary Season” earned the Gold for Best Director and a Bronze for Best Music Special.  “The New York Philharmonic This Week” was recognized with a Silver trophy for Best Regularly Scheduled Music Program. Mark Travis, Associate Director of Media for the New York Philharmonic took home the Gold for Best Director.

L to R: Mark Travis, Amy Travis, Hilaria Baldwin, and Alec Baldwin, Radio Host of the New York Philharmonic "This Week"

For a complete list of all the 2017 award-winning entries please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/worldsbestradio/2017/

 

 

 

 

 

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Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Peter Lack

Radio on Radio features insights and observations on the wonderful world of Radio by New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury members.

Each year NYF recruits a world class Grand Jury comprised of award-winning directors,

Peter Lack, Head of hr3-Comedy for Hessischer Rundfunk, Germany

producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today.

In our weekly Radio on Radio interview we’ll take an insider’s look at the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, award-winning Peter Lack, Head of hr3-Comedy for Hessischer Rundfunk, Germany. Peter has earned both Silver and Bronze New York Festivals Radio Awards trophies  in the Best Comedy / Humor Personality category and was inducted into both the “Radio Hall Of Fame” and the “Broadcasters Hall Of Fame.”

Prior to his work in radio,  the multi-talented radio executive was working in the music business.Working with different groups in the beginning of the 1980s, among others The erasers , Corpus Kristi and the school sports founded in 1983. The erasers are also referred to as Limburg’s first punk band. In 1986, Peter had a phenomenal success with a   a completely different musical direction:Love Spy , sung by the native Lüneburg, Mike Mareen, Peter Lack sold 6.5 million copies worldwide.

Peter is active as a DJ: every weekend, in and around Hessen, he has released CD-compilations with the title Clubtraxx and / or Club Classics as part of his program 0138-6000.

Keep reading to find out Peter’s thoughts about how the radio world has shifted, what he’d be doing in radio if money wasn’t a motivator, and his views on freedom of the press.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Peter Lack:The ‘biggest shift’ in my local radio world in the past year definitely was the move of the morning show host from my station’s main competitor over to us and then back to his former employer after just a short while. Just kidding. But seriously: radio stations run the risk of losing more and more ground to streaming services and the like. I am counting on the cleverness of our industry to keep up to date with the help of new media and stuff, and to put regional reporting, the real value of our medium for its broadcasting region, into focus. This way radio will be around for a long time to come. It is irreplaceable, like a basic staple.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Peter Lack: In our local MOR radio world definitely not. I see it as the result of apprehensive squinting at the competition and reacting to it. This is nothing new, but it’s

Peter Lack

getting more and more extreme. The revolutionary thing about it is, that there is no such thing as a revolution over here.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?


Peter Lack: To be honest, I am already doing my dream show, and looking back I have always been able to do so. So I have no unfulfilled wishes. But dreaming for a moment: if money really did not play a role, and my livelihood would be ensured to its present level – if I had a free wish, then I would like to have a job as an errand boy for Howard Stern or for Steve Jones of Jonesys Jukebox on KLOS-FM. These guys probably have even more fun at their job than I do.

 

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Peter Lack: You are probably asking ‘cos of Trump’s aggressive behavior towards individual media. Freedom of the press is an important cornerstone of our democratic society, the highest asset in our industry. I’m thinking of Obama and his appeal for freedom of the press in his last press conference before officially stepping down. He said something like “They should not be flatterers, but instead ask skeptical and tough questions. They are not supposed to be friendly, but take a critical look at people who have enormous power.” Point.

Check out the 2017 Radio Awards competition Finalists: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/main.php?p=rp2017

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

 

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Natalie Oram

Radio on Radio features insights and observations on the wonderful world of Radio by New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury members.

Each year NYF recruits a world class Grand Jury comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today.

 

Natalie Oram, Composer, Producer and Voice-Over Artist for Rockbarn Media, UK

In our weekly Radio on Radio interview we’ll take an insider’s look at the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, award-winning Natalie Oram: Composer Producer, and Voice Over Artist for Rockbarn Media United Kingdom.

In 2012, Natalie won Gold at the New York Festivals International Radio Programs and Promotions Awards for Best Music Special for her hour-long BBC documentary, “World Piece” that she single-handedly created, composed the soundtrack and produced.

In the interview below Natalie shares her thoughts on the development of radio into a multi-format audio visual interactivity; her dream show she’d love to create, the importance of freedom of the press and so much more.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Natalie Oram: I think that we are going to see a real continuation of the transformation of radio from pure audio traveling through airwaves from broadcaster (informer) to the listening consumer (receiver) to further reaching multi-format audio-visual interactivity where the informer and receiver lines are blurred and combined, online presence, on-demand and apps for example, all of which we are seeing and hearing now. That’s the point, we see and hear radio now!

I know that this has already been the case for many years, with the development of the ‘story’ for instance needing to be conceived and conveyed not only as speech over the radio, but the impetus has grown enormously for creating added-value content; putting it up online, adding photographs, videos, posting it on social media and inviting the audience to engage and interact at their convenience. In fact, I think that potentially these elements are not really seen as ‘added-value’ content anymore, instead, I think that all these additional items to the original format have now become integral facets of the content, all rolled into one.

It seems more and more now however, that radio stations are not just the focal point of information from which the information gets formulated into content and transmitted. Instead, it seems it has partly become a sort of ‘filter’ or sieve through which user-generated content is given a platform and proliferated as well as, interestingly, acting almost like an ‘exchange’.

Radio broadcast is certainly not one-sided anymore; informer to receiver. I think a big shift is in audience and how they feel about their radio station and interact with it. I think it used to be a sense of belonging, like picking the newspaper that you choose to read and sticking with that one. Now, I believe we do still have that sense of belonging to ‘my favourite radio stations for ‘these’ reasons’, but also, I think nowadays we, the listeners, also have a sense of ownership and arguably, content ownership.

The freedom and ease to interact, comment, engage with a story or feature is enormous and fairly unbounding. I don’t know whether I’m alone in thinking that several years ago, it was quite a ‘big’ thing to do to contact a radio station…almost brave! Now, you can just pop on to social media or your email and instantaneously ping off whatever your reaction or thought is and reach the hub of the action immediately. And, of course, a number of years ago, one would call the radio station as the principle means of contact, or write a letter. Quite a lot of personal effort and investment goes into actually physically talking to someone or penning a letter. You think more about it, it takes time and you ostensibly feel the pressure of more ‘solid’ two-sided interaction. Now, it is a little more ‘faceless’ and less intrusive upon your own personal space because social media or email for instance seems to remove certain barriers; I allude the phrase, “People say things on social media that they would never say to someone face-to-face”. And of course, with the instant/immediate nature of this kind of communication, one could consider that less thought goes into what is being remarked.

Listeners can now grab whatever subject with both hands and continue the conversation, debate, discussion etc. ‘off-air’, online and immediately in communication with other listeners any time. Radio content appears to be a sort of catalyst for this now across more mediums than before – which reminds me of a tip while studying my Masters in Broadcast Journalism degree, “Find the angle that people will talk about first thing when they get home or to the pub later!” Now, it’s presenting the topic (using the same tip!) and pushing it away from the jetty into the river of wild, wide-ranging, multiple platform interaction and seeing where it goes…And here’s another development, the ‘deliverers’ of that content within radio can now gauge reaction immediately, monitor it and watch it develop virally and see what is trending…a word we are all so used to now, but technically, in this denotation, has only existed for a few years!

Interestingly however, radio can now feed from these interactions and potentially, spin out even more angles! So, does this mean that topics or points of interest get discussed more in-depth, more intensely picked apart, more widely consumed or comprehended? I don’t know. Possibly and logically, yes. Is this a good thing? Yes, I think so. Is user-generated content and interaction potentially moulding and influencing the direction of news and media discussion through the media monitoring and assessing how much traction a subject is getting? …Yes, to a certain extent I think, but I’ll leave that up to you whether you agree or disagree if that’s a good or bad thing!

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Natalie Oram: Ah, a dream show. Well, from me, it would have to be musical one way or another! I’d like to organize a great big jam session live on air with the greatest musicians, past and present, living and departed! It would involve musicians ranging from famous artists and composers to undiscovered ones and ones who just play because they love it, from all over the world and from all genres. It would be driven a little like that comedy show, ‘Whose Line is it Anyway?’ in terms of genres to play etc. and everything has to be improvised. Oh, and I’d like to be able to play my instruments too – naturally! All the while, the music would be interspersed with great flowing conversation about music and opened up to the listeners. You could even open it out further to listeners and invite them onto video-calling to then jam together across cyberspace (I’ve done that in the past – one instance was me in the UK, a friend in Mexico, another in the USA and another in Patagonia! It was amazing!) It all would then of course be so successful that it would have to be serialised and I could live out my days jamming and listening to music in great company. Oh, and in the serialisation, it would then just have to travel all across the world, a little like ‘The Grand Tour’ and have pop-up jam sessions in an endless number of destinations, celebrating the music of each and every culture. Completely impossible, but you did say ‘dream’ show! …Although, if that were possible (not the actual bringing people back from the dead part though obviously!), then you heard it here first and don’t you dare do this without me!

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

Natalie Oram: Freedom of the press is vital, there’s no doubt about it. It can be delivered perfectly, but, it can be abused. It can be the lynchpin of a situation or it can be the potential downfall. What I do believe is that it should be a real sign of a true democracy. But, is the press ever truly free?! Ha! There is the big question! Think consumerism, commercialism, populism, elitism so many ‘isms’ (!), spin, propaganda… While we all perhaps wish to believe that none of these things have an effect on the news or press be it from the outside world or internally within the media, I think, intentionally or not, they have the potential to. The key is for the press to have the freedom to work within these ‘isms’, the power, ability, free objectivity and knowledge to sift out the bias and influence from the fact, and finally have the capability to produce and transmit material and content that is fair, accurate, balanced and contemporaneous.

While perhaps some of the above seems a little ‘idealist’, I do like to think that the press that I am used to does have a freedom and does work to the benefit of society within these ‘isms’ (among many other things!).

An interesting influence on the press nowadays however is the practically exponential growth and abundance of information sources from which it is being fed. I wonder if there could be a case of ‘saturation’ within the press because of this; with the advent of rolling news, 24-hours a day, 7 days a week and the need for sustenance to support this. I think this is certainly amplified by the constancy of social media, online media and global social interaction. The combination of the arguable influence of consumer-lead interaction making discursive trends (as mentioned in one of my previous answers) and the press being able to monitor and assess how ‘stickable’ a story is for instance by gauging the reaction and interest in near real-time, does make me wonder whether items get developed further or sustained because of what is seemingly coming out as ‘popular’ and thus further content gets steered towards the ‘popular’ trends. Funnily enough, I do not really see much wrong with that, just as long as there is always a platform and appetite for independent thought. There must be a freedom for this however as if there is not, then arguably, the freedom of the press could be being degraded by the movement of the populous showing interest in one story and not another…interesting! I’m being devil’s advocate here I know! I do believe though that the press should have the objectivity and capability of sorting through all of this and getting to the factual nucleus and they should definitely have the freedom to be able to do just that.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Natalie Oram: Now, this is a great question for a musician and radio documentary-maker!! Everything I do comes through the medium of sound. I once wrote a paper at university while studying for my Music degree arguing how sound/music could be considered the most influential and powerful form of art. Among many reasons and concepts/ideas, I presented that it is one of the few things that rely almost completely on just one sense – hearing.

Sound is not tactile, you cannot see it in its natural realised form (i.e. when it is actually making noise, not on paper or a score or in waveform on a screen – unless of course you put it with another medium like sand or water for instance…but you need that other medium to do that!). You cannot taste it, yet it can have an effect on how you taste food… Yes, you can feel it, quite literally when the sound waves are vibrating in such a manner that you can feel it pulsing through your body, but you cannot touch it. It can touch you, but on an emotional or reactionary basis…again non-tangible. I LOVE that! Sound is even exceptionally powerful when it is absent. Sound rocks! So, in my opinion, while the essay was of course beautifully balanced, discursive and comprehensive (naturally! Ha!), I think that this existence in the principally intangible makes sound so close to magic you can almost taste it…or not as the case may be!

So, what does this all have to do with your question, well, because of the transcendental nature of sound, audio, music etc. I believe that it has the power to be a short-cut to the brain, your emotions and imagination. You, as a pure listener, don’t have many ‘horizon-points’ to focus on, or anchors to hold on to and guide you with sound, because you are not able to use your other senses as much to pilot you, so, you start drawing on your imagination and your emotions. Equally, because your other senses are less called upon, it means you can focus more on the senses being stimulated. You don’t particularly have to compute, comprehend or decipher any visual, taste or smell for instance to absorb the sound and compute what you are hearing. This means your brain is really rather free in the boundless arena of the computation of the sound that immediately our less tangible facets like emotion, feelings, memories and imagination can come to the fore and directly into play. This then becomes a completely unique and personal and utterly individualised experience.

All of this provides us ‘Audioteers’ (yes, Musketeers of audio…does that work?!) an infinite world of boundless creativity and invention. Telling a story through sound or creating a sonic experience that is purely based in sound is one of the most exciting, challenging, interesting, fun, creative and immersive things to do in my opinion and I love it. Equally, it can create, again in my opinion, the most immersive, resonant (pardon the pun!) and individual experience for the consumer/receiver of this material.

For my documentary that was very kindly honoured with Gold by the New York Festivals, I

Natalie Oram Accepting the NYF Gold Trophy for Best Music Special in 2012

wanted to do more than ‘just tell a story’. I wanted my listeners to come into the world of my documentary with me and dive into the journey completely in an intimately shared experience. Taking this to its absolute base level for instance, yes, I could have just described being in an aeroplane flying over to America and landing in the cacophonous LAX all on my own. Compelling? ‘Yeah, kinda’, especially with the inclusion of my actual feelings at the time. What’s even better? Setting my narration on top of a bed of aeroplane atmos, taking actuality from LAX and engineering it so when I stepped out of the airport in the narration, the audio changed sonically to represent the change in location, give motion to the character, to the narration. Yes, I could just describe the emails at the start of the documentary story…what’s better, putting typing noises in there! The ‘bing’ of an email being received, reading the emails out in character voices and engineering them so that they sound like their coming through a form of communication technology rather than in person…Simple! And you know what, it’s FUN to do! But it localises the story and gives literal, recognisable, digestible ‘hooks’ with which my listener could identify and ratify their imagination, making the imaginary journey even more immersive and real, without asking them to work too hard to have a fulfilling experience.

There are so many other things that you can do with audio landscapes and theatre of the mind when it comes to sound and inspiring the imagination – these two examples are just very basic examples. Others are the use of music and/or soundscapes and the emotional effect of that; sonically illustrating and amplifying emotion in soundtracks, creating emotion through soundtrack and so on.

With audio and sound, you have the unique opportunity to effectively and cleverly put all your eggs in one basket and not worry about trying to portray literally what something looks like for someone to actually see, what something smells like for someone to actually smell, what something tastes like for someone to actually taste etc. Equally, you don’t need to worry how accurately to your concept or intention it is actually going be seen, smelt and tasted by someone. Instead, you use one medium – sound – and try to replicate, inspire, create and encompass all those senses through that one medium in ostensibly one of the most immersive and personal ways possible. And that, is all done though engaging someone’s brain through their auditory system and inspiring someone’s imagination and emotions to create the images, the scene, the smell, the touch and feeling etc. themselves.

No-one’s imagination is identical to another and as humans, we are naturally predisposed to using our imaginations. With sound; creating audio landscapes, soundscapes, capturing actuality, creating sonic hooks, composing or using music etc. etc., we have an amazing tool to tap into anyone’s imagination in, in my opinion (!), the most unsullied, direct, pure and beautifully magical way, and what’s more, do it well, it is a work of transcendental art…in my opinion!

There’s still time to enter your best work! To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Matt Lissack

Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today, their opinions on the importance of free speech, their thoughts on creating their dream show and where imagination comes into play.

Matt Lissack 97.4 /103.2 Capital FM

NYF’s Grand Jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Matt Lissack, Presenter, for Capital Breakfast on 97.4/103.2 Capital FM.

Matt started his career on stations, such as: South Hams Radio, Plymouth Sound and Gemini FM. During the time he was hosting mid-mornings on Plymouth Sound,  and GWR FM snapped him up.

His career has also seen him present programmes on Capital 95.8 in London and The Capital Network – broadcasting to many major radio markets such as: London, Birmingham and Manchester. His show has won him the title of ‘Best Breakfast Show’ at the Arqiva Radio Awards, both in 2014 and 2016.

Keep reading to find out more about Matt’s thoughts on the challenges for radio programmers, the shift in online/video content in radio,  his dream show to create and the art of storytelling on radio.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Matt Lissack: We’ve seen a huge shift in digital strategies over the last few years.  I think the use of social media, online video content and online advertising will grow and become radio’s ‘bread and butter’.  Whilst we’ll never forget what radio has always been about – entertainment for the ears – I think that radio will use visuals to compliment content much more in the years to come.  After all, online platforms are becoming where our audience spends much more of its time, so why miss out on the opportunity to engage with them this way?! The challenge for programmers now though is to coach new talent to remember that, despite these additional visual platforms, ‘theatre of the mind’ in radio has and will always be key.

I’m convinced in-car wifi will be a radio game changer in the not too distant future too!

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Matt Lissack: We’re seeing a huge shift in online/video content to complement radio at the moment.  Groups are heavily investing in the tech to deliver this to our audience. We’ve noticed what the audience wants and we’re delivering it to them.  Take Capital London, for example – there’s been some heavy investment recently on a studio refurb. The result is fantastic – a radio studio that rivals some TV studios!

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Matt Lissack: OK, if I had a radio station to play with and I could do anything with it, I’d firstly look at getting the best talent on.  For me, content is why I listen to radio.  Sure, music is a massive part of our business, but if I want a USP over services like Apple Music or Spotify, I’ll need more than a good song to keep me listening for longer. If I want funny and engaging content to lift me up, emotionally affect me and tell my friends about, radio wins every time.  For that reason, I’d get my cheque book out and hire Kyle and Jackie O from Sydney’s KIIS.  I listen most days from the UK and they are just simply the best at breakfast radio – not to mention what they’ve done for that radio station’s audience reach since moving from 2DAY FM! I’m just not sure my old boss (now ARN Group Programme Director) Duncan Campbell would allow me to take them off him!

Kyle and Jackie O from Sydney’s KIIS

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Matt Lissack: Storytelling on radio is an art. As a species, humans respond to emotions and pictures much better than just words on their own. Theatre of the mind is crucial when it comes to engaging a radio audience because they have no pictures to see, just audio to listen to.  I try to bring stories to life as much as possible when talking about them.  What did I see? What did I smell? What did I feel? We’re taking the listener on that journey with us.  The more they can picture elements of your story, the more they’re going to engage with it and relate to it (and most importantly, you as a personality).

When it comes to theatre of the mind, there’s a big difference between “I went to watch the football in the freezing cold last night” to “so there I was, in my huge duffle coat, watching the football in the freezing cold stands, with my hands wrapped around a steaming cup of coffee to keep me warm.”

There’s still time to enter your best work! To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF’s Open Mic: Radio on Radio with James Vyver

New York Festivals: Radio on Radio features insights and observations on the wonderful world of Radio by New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury members. NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today.

James Vyver, Political Producer, ABC Australia

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, James Vyver. James is the Political Producer, Australian Broadcasting Corporation with RN Drive at Parliament House. James has also produced documentaries for RN, reported for 730 ACT and contributed to national radio coverage of events such the Australia of the Year Awards and Anzac Day.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

James Vyver: Radio has survived in large part because of its immediacy, but how the industry deals with the modern time shifted world is the ongoing challenge. There is so much competition now the traditional linear schedule is almost a thing of the past. Why should I listen to the radio in real time when I could be watching YouTube, binge watching a TV series or streaming music on Spotify? Well I think sticking to what live radio does best – making the listener feel like they are part of something, that they are enjoying a shared experience with all the other people who have their radio on. Hard to do but unbeatable if you get it right. As for long format; I think the rise and rise of podcasts means more stories can be told more ways – there are so many opportunities for those who love a good narrative. That said, this generation of producers (me included) have their work cut out producing an aural format in a visual age.

A big shift I’ve noticed in Australia is the way in which people are listening to radio of all kinds. I work for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and our audience is increasingly listening to live radio on their phone, via the streaming service or even digital radios in their cars.

New York Festivals:What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?


Some kind global journalism documentary adventure! Significant and dynamic cultural events told through the people who are there – Day of the Dead in Mexcio, Mardi Gras in New Orleans, Dakar Rally. A team of correspondents ready to immersive themselves in the most interesting things happening on the planet. Yes, I would be one of the them!

New York Festivals:Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

It’s easy to be worthy on this topic if you’re a journalist, but I do think the jobs we have are a major part of a functioning democracy. Imagine a world without journalism, particularly politics coverage, not pretty! Press freedom is about keeping power in check with truth and that can only be done with independent reporting. In lots of ways the current political climate in the US and the echoes it’s having around the world are the opportunity for journalism’s finest hour. How commercial networks stay classy while still turning a buck is a challenge, these days it’s clicks and not the public interest is what makes decisions about who covers what. But a ‘great story’ is usually great because it applies and/or appeals to most people – that will always sell.

 

New York Festivals:Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

I LOVE good actuality. I’m obsessive about location recordings and love pointing my microphone at those things on the periphery of my main subject in the field. Recording, compiling, editing and mixing those sounds as part of documentary is one of my favourite parts of the job. Crafting those and image of those scenes or locations are what make a program shine. Good sound can transport the listener; there can be there with you in an instant!

There’s still time to enter your best work! To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with John MacCalman

Radio on Radio features insights and observations on the wonderful world of Radio by New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury members. NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

John MacCalman, Journalist, Broadcast Producer, Web Editor for Radio Clyde

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, John MacCalman, Travel and Aviation Journalist, Broadcast Producer and Web Editor.

John MacCalman is one of the original employees at Radio Clyde joining the station in November 1973. For over three decades, he was at the helm as Production Controller at Radio Clyde. Through the 80s and 90s, while John was on board, the station won Sony Station of the year 3 times and was nominated twice. He was the producer on two Sony winning shows for Best Rock and Pop Programme – Hue and Cry (1989) and The Big Day C1 (1991). In 2000, John applied his talents to work on 3C – Continuous Cool Country – SRH’s award winning contribution to the DAB output that provided a 24 country music service that no other UK broadcaster could match. In June of 2006, John was appointed Web Editor for Radio Clyde, increasing unique visitors, page impressions and VIP memberships by ensuring that the Radio Clyde’s website was as dynamic as the station. “If it happened on the air, it would be on the web, said John.”  Since 2001, John has contributed a regular Aviation column called “On the Fly” to the weekly Scottish Travel Agent’s News (STAN) and on a weekly basis to the Campbell Express in Campbell, California.

In the interview below John discusses how the internet and social media are advancing radio creativity, what dream show he’d love to create,his favorite all time radio drama and more.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

John MacCalman: The internet and social media are the driving forces in radio creativity in the years ahead.  Social media has become the fastest distribution of “news”

The most serious problem to be addressed is the accuracy of that “news”.  In the past year that revolution has exploded. Radio that empowers its audience to interact with the station is the future.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

John MacCalman: Through social media and the internet a station which creates original, stimulating, inspiring, entertaining content can reach a world audience no matter how small the station.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

John MacCalman: Radio’s ability to create mind pictures is probably its most valuable asset. My dream show would probably be a quality drama whereby through voice and sound effects you can create what would cost millions on TV. Money would be spent on using the best talent.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press?

John MacCalman: While press freedom is fundamental in the free world, that freedom should be used to abuse.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

John MacCalman: My all time favourite drama was War of the Worlds. That says it all!

 

 

 

There’s still time to enter your best work! To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

 

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Graham Mack

Radio on Radio features insights and observations on the wonderful world of Radio by New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury members. NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today.

Graham Mack, Program Director for BOB fm UK

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Graham Mack, Program Director for BOB fm UK.

Graham Mack is a multi-award winning radio programmer and presenter with over 20 years experience. He earned the Bronze NYF Radio Award for Best Radio Personality for a compilation from The Graham Mack Breakfast Show, which is a news/talk program produced by Mack Media Limited and broadcast on BBC Wiltshire’s Swindon service, weekday mornings 6.30am to 9am. The show’s purpose is to inform and above all entertain the Swindon market, which has a population of 300,000 people. He has achieved consistent ratings success in talk and music formats, working for commercial radio and the BBC, on-air and in management.

Keep reading to find out more about Graham including his views on content creation, ideas for his dream show, the importance of freedom of the press and more.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Graham Mack: We’re going to see the further rise of the content creator over the distributor. In the past the distributors, the people with the radio stations and the transmitters, controlled the game. In the new multi-platform world with access to distribution becoming more accessible to everyone, it’s the creative people that make the content that will thrive. The distributors need content but if they want market exclusivity, they’ll have to give the content creators what they want in return. Unfortunately, over the past year I’ve noticed some big “old media” distributors going the other way and reducing the amount of original content they provide to cut costs. This is a mistake and will accelerate their demise.

New York Festivals:  Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Graham Mack: It depends how you define “radio”. If you’re talking about broadcast radio then, no. Broadcasters seem to be stuck in a rut, regurgitating tired old ideas. If you define radio as audio content then, yes, there is a revolution going on. With cheap access to audio hardware and software tools it’s never been easier to create great radio. The amount of spoken word content going out as podcasts and other online distribution platforms continues to grow and it’s becoming more niche and more personal.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Graham Mack: My dream show would be a talk show with music, the radio version of a glossy magazine. Interviews with interesting people, reports from interesting places, opinion pieces and interaction with listeners. Glossy magazines are full of photographs, that’s what the music would be because some people who “read” glossy magazines only like looking at the pictures.

New York Festivals: Will you talk about the importance of freedom of press

Graham Mack: Donald Trump got elected by manipulating fears based on prejudice. The same thing happened with Brexit. Prejudice feeds on ignorance. The press needs to be free to hold our leaders to account and use facts to debunk fake news, misconceptions and pseudoscience peddled by politicians and big business. Otherwise we won’t get news, we’ll just get propaganda.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theater of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Graham Mack: The difference between radio and TV is that on the radio the pictures are better. It’s been said many times and the best content creators are the ones that can paint pictures with sound. The treatment is as important as the story. Often the story can’t be changed but there are infinite ways it can be told.

There’s still time to enter your best work! To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Daithi McMahon

NYF’s Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today. NYF’s Grand Jury is comprised of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives who are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

Daithi McMahon: Producer, Editor, Dramaturge, Writer, Henchman Productions Ireland

2017 Grand Jury member Daithi McMahon spent a few minutes with NYF sharing his creative insights on the integration of social media into Radio, the favorite programs he created, and  his thoughts on what dream project he would like to create.

Daithi McMahon is multi-award winning radio playwright, director, dramaturge, producer and sound engineer with Ireland’s Henchman Productions. His productions range from historical radio dramas to contemporary documentaries and features. His projects have earned him awards and accolades from both international and national awards competition including multiple wins at New York Festivals, scoring a Gold Medal for Best Writing and a Silver Medal for Best Drama Special for “Tom Crean – Endurance”  as well as national radio awards in Ireland and two nominations for Prix Europa.

Daithi is lecturer in radio production and scriptwriting at the University of Derby in England. His research interests include radio’s convergence with social media, the future development of radio drama, Millennials and radio, and the recording of oral history. Daithi is currently writing his doctoral thesis on the impact of Facebook on the Irish radio industry.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Daithi McMahon: The biggest changes continue to come from social media and the integration of these platforms into radio programming. I’ve noticed also that there have been attempts lately to use radio drama as a lure to attract younger audiences. Whether this strategy works or not remains to be seen but at least the stations are trying something different and innovative, and ironically, going back to what made radio such a great entertainment medium in the past.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Daithi McMahon: Yes I think so and this is with regards social media and the integration of social media interaction into the radio producer’s remit. This is particularly relevant to the next generation of listeners who are more likely to come across a radio station’s content online than on-air. Whatever way the audience is engaged it must be good news for radio because it is vital the next generation has radio in their lives in some form or another for the medium to survive.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Daithi McMahon: I would really like to produce a radio drama series set amongst the soldiers during wartime. I think the dramatic possibilities and audio soundscapes would be fantastic. Or else a sci-fi production set in space would be fun to make also.

Irish explorer Tom Crean prepares to travel to the South Pole with Captain Scott in 1911.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theatre of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Daithi McMahon: As a radio dramatist I am all about the theatre of the mind and creating images in the listener’s mind. Some of the work I am most proud of are the Tom Crean dramas that were set in the Antarctic. I really enjoyed creating those locations in the audience’s mind, something that is very difficult and expensive to do on TV/film.

There’s still time to enter your best work! To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

 

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NYF Open Mic: Radio on Radio with Abhishek Sharma

Radio on Radio features New York Festivals International Radio Program Awards Grand Jury’s insights and observations on the transformation taking place in the industry today, their opinions on the importance of free speech, their thoughts on creating their dream show and where imagination comes into play.

Abhishek Sharma, Associate Programming Director, Radio City 91.1FM India

NYF’s Grand Jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative radio programs heard on radio today. Who better to share their insider information on the wonderful world of radio than this respected group of prominent industry thought leaders?

This week NYF’s Radio on Radio will explore the evolution taking place in the world of radio with 2017 Grand Jury member, Abhishek Sharma, Associate Programming Director for India’s Radio City 91.1 FM.

Abhishek’s radio career spans over a decade with experience working with popular Indian Radio brands like the Radio City and Radio Mantra. His work has been awarded at the New York festivals, India Radio Forum, Golden Mikes, ACEF and Radio Duniya awards.

He has hosted and executed campaigns like Shukriya Soldier that was broadcasted globally including USA, India, New Zealand, Australia and UAE and was recognized by award competitions in India and abroad. His campaign Dil Deke Dekho was one of the most appreciated initiatives of (2015-2016) and was the most awarded radio campaigns of the year.

Organ donation kiosk during Radio City 91.1 FM Dil Deke Dekho

 

 

 

 

 

In the interview below Abhishek shares his insights on the shifts taking place in radio today, the dream show he’d love to create, and how imagination supplies an edge to radio.

New York Festivals: How will radio transform in the coming years? What is the biggest shift you’ve noticed this past year?

Abhishek Sharma: Radio is under a transformation phase even right now, or rather I should say that it has moved ahead from being just about radio. With the rise of social media, its impact on the target group of each broadcaster has grown massively. Fortunately broadcasters around the globe have realized its potential and today radio content is processed in such a manner that it can be podcasted with a semi professional video on social media as well. Radio stations have verified twitter, insta and FB handles with fans requesting their music, chatting with the RJs and participating in polls. The RJs have moved on from being just “pleasant chatters on radio” to self opinionated superstars on digital media. Needless to say bringing about a revolution in terms of content, music is much easier than it was ever.

New York Festivals: Is there a revolution going on today in radio content?

Abhishek Sharma: As far Indian radio is concerned I think we do need a content revolution. On comparing radio storytelling with cinema we see that new avenues/ genres are seldom tried via broadcasters. 90% of radio content in India still relies upon humor. I would not say that we don’t do meaning full radio but the core or route generally remains humour. Whereas cinema on the other hand has always been experimenting genres like action, politics, war, drama, sex, even disgust. I think with more and more exposure to the world media and internet broadcasters will actively do stuff that is revolutionary in nature.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream show to create, budget no object?

Abhishek Sharma: I would love to be a part of a show that influences people not just in India but across the globe. A show that knows no boundaries, can helps people connect with loved ones in different corners of the world, take music and cultures from one part of the world to another.

New York Festivals: Audio landscapes, theatre of the mind, how does imagination come into play?

Abhishek Sharma: Imagination and theater of mind do differentiate/ provide an edge to radio from all other mediums like television or even films. The pictures built are more beautiful and relevant. A war scene is as deadly as budgeted  as a set for a TV series or film, it’s relevant to me because it’s a zone that I had created as per my imagination. A drama series on radio is more like reading a book where the story unfolds layer by layer, but the edge remains, the audio landscape makes it more and more believable and relevant.

To enter go to: Log In and for additional information go to: Rules and Regulations.

Join New York Festivals Monday, June 19, 2017 as we honor the World’s Best Radio Programs at an awards ceremony at in New York City. To view the 2016 World’s Best Radio Program Ceremony Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/media/rp/2016/

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