Open Mic Spotlight: Nicky Davis

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members who judge creative entries from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today, their efforts have resulted in the 2018 NYF Radio Awards Finalists.

Nick Davis

This week’s Spotlight interview features Nick Davis, Manager of Program Development for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, where he is responsible for the ongoing development of local programming in radio, television and online.

Nick has worked in radio, television and print for the past 27 years covering everything from current affairs to the arts. He has won many awards for his journalism, including a 2006 Gabriel Award. For the past 17 years he has worked at CBC as a reporter and producer — most notably as Senior Producer for Metro Morning, the number one morning show in Toronto.

New York Festivals: How did you get your start in the radio industry?

Nick Davis: I started in radio quite by accident. I was walking in the food court while in university during freshman orientation week when a man at a table asked me if I wanted to volunteer at the school radio station. I politely declined, but the man continued with his spiel of how great it would be and what an opportunity to express myself. I politely declined again, but the man would not take no for an answer. He eventually wore me down and I agreed to volunteer for CHRY Radio at York University. The accident part was I that I had no intention of going to the orientation fair. I got lost looking for the bookstore.

Needless to say, getting lost help me find my future career.

New York Festivals: What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen in the industry?

Nick Davis: The industry has changed dramatically in the 30 years I have been a journalist. Technology, of course, has been the biggest change. When I started in radio you had to listen to your program of choice at the time it aired on the radio. Now people listen to their audio content when they want and how they want. From on demand content to podcasts there are numerous ways people consume audio content.

New York Festivals: What is the responsibility of journalists in today’s world?

Nick Davis: From a technical point of view, journalists are responsible for filing stories on multiple platforms – digital, television, radio and social media. From a practical point of view, journalists are responsible for telling the truth. The same thing they were charged with at the beginning of journalism. And the truth should help people have a better understanding of the world we live.

New York Festivals: How has podcasting changed the way you create content?

Nick Davis: Podcasting has allowed us to create content that is not constricted by the framework of terrestrial radio. Audio stories can be 5 minutes or 50 minutes and we can weave in more elements that help us tell better stories. No need to worry about commercials or news break that sometimes can interrupt the flow of storytelling. Podcasts have also allowed us to reach new and more defined audiences.

New York Festivals: What do you think are the hallmarks of award-winning work?

Nick Davis: Award-winning work is good storytelling that makes you feel something. It makes you angry. It makes you sad. It makes you cry. It makes you happy. It makes you laugh. It makes you think. It makes you self-reflective. It moves you to action. On the course of whatever emotional and intellectual journey the story takes you on, hopefully it`s filled with surprise, wonder and awe.

For more information on the 2018 New York Festivals Radio Program Awards or to view the 2018 Finalists please visit HERE.  For information or tickets for the 2018 Radio Awards gala taking place on June 18th in New York City, please visit HERE.

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Open Mic Spotlight: Tim Zunckel

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members who judge creative entries from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today, their efforts have resulted in the 2018 NYF Radio Awards Finalists.

This week’s Spotlight interview features Tim Zunckel, Programming Consultant for
Connect South Africa. Tim is an award-winning creative programmer, problem solver and lover of audio and storytelling with a variety of experience in the radio, music and audio space. He loves creative ideas and innovation and  is passionate about developing talent. Tim is actively involved in radio training, coaching and consulting in South Africa as well as Africa.

New York Festivals: How did you get your start in the radio industry?

Tim Zunckel

Tim Zunckel: The airwaves in South Africa were democratised in 1994 and there was a wealth of new listening opportunity soon thereafter. My local University was licensed to broadcast and as a school student I fell in love with the ability to listen to people my age talking about things that affected me, playing the music I loved. I was hooked. My friends were hooked. It was literally something that changed our lives, the ability to listen to our own station.

When I went to university I applied and was lucky enough to be selected to work as a student volunteer. It’s a station I spent twelve years with, it launched my career and I am proud to still be associated with them.

New York Festivals: What was the turning point in your career?

Tim Zunckel: At a point I realised I was a radio enthusiast. I enjoyed working in radio but I was treating it like a hobby. It was a full time hobby but I wasn’t taking it seriously. I changed my approach to my on-air work, production, knowledge base and contact network. I started doing my own feedback sessions and kept accurate logs of times, guests, songs and events. Within in six months my game had changed. I was a professional operating at the next level. It was that process that built my foundation to being a radio programmer.

New York Festivals: Did you have a mentor, if so how did they help you achieve your career goals?

Tim Zunckel: No. And that is why I actively try and help anyone who seeks advice, directions and knowledge. In the South African context, empowering young people to become creative professionals is essential to ensuring a new generation of content creators. I work with selected individuals for selected periods of time to help them grow and achieve their career goals. I have been lucky to work with some talented individuals and have used this as a process to learn and engage.

New York Festivals: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Tim Zunckel: Invest in your own career.

Don’t wait for people to help you or give advice. Seek what you are looking for, chase it, ask questions, consider the problem and look for an answer. Be prepared to spend money on investing in equipment, courses, travel and the creative process. Self investing is never wasted.

New York Festivals: What creative projects are next for you?

Tim Zunckel: I work with the team at the University of the Witswatersrand at the the Wits Radio Academy and am the Director of Radio Days Africa. Radio Days Africa is a platform for engagement, debate, learning and connecting. We are currently in the planning phase for our 9th edition of RDA and am excited about being able to contribute to the African radio agenda through this process.

For more information on the 2018 New York Festivals Radio Program Awards or to view the 2018 Finalists please visit HERE.  For information or tickets for the 2018 Radio Awards gala taking place on June 18th in New York City, please visit HERE.

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Open Mic Spotlight: Jon Tjhia

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

Grand Jury member, Jon Tjhia is the Wheeler Centre’s Senior Digital Editor. He has worked on the Wheeler Centre’s multimedia, editorial and digital projects since 2010, including #discuss, the short-form multimedia series Housekeeping, and long-form podcast series Better Off Dead and The Messenger, which won several awards.

He’s a co-editor and co-founder of the Australian Audio Guide, and a member of the 2018 New York Festivals Radio Awards Grand Jury.

Jon also produces the Paper Radio literary fiction and creative non-fiction podcast, plays music with Speed Painters and has served on Audiocraft’s 2017 programming committee. In 2016, he was a top-ten finalist in Radiotopia’s Podquest competition.
Better Off Dead was named Finalist at New York Festivals Radio Awards 2016.

Michael Green (left), Behind the Wire and Jon Tjhia (right) of the Wheeler Centre accepting the 2017 NYF Grand Award.

The Messenger was awarded the Grand Trophy and two Gold Medals at New York Festivals Radio Awards 2017; the 2017 UNAA Media Award for Best Radio Documentary; the 2017 Walkley Award for Radio/Audio Feature; and (with Behind the Wire’s They Cannot Take the Sky), the 2017 Australian Human Rights Commission Media Award. It was also a finalist at the 2017 Quill Awards.

New York Festivals: How did you get your start in the radio industry?

Jon Tjhia: I had always been interested in live radio, and dabbled in it (as many particularly smitten music fans do here in Australia), but I had never really considered producing as something I was especially invested in. That changed when I got a job working at the ABC – Australia’s national broadcaster – as a web developer and digital producer. I was supporting broadcasters whose work went out across the region in several different languages. Alongside all the work around rebroadcast and transmitter licenses that my colleagues were doing, my team was grappling with this new thing called podcasting. I loved how open-ended that was back then; there were barely any established conventions, so you got to really decide how you were going to present your material in a feed, and question why.

Eventually, I started producing interviews with musicians from the Pacific Islands for a cross-platform competition we were running, and slowly began applying my music production skills to making packages that would sometimes find their way onto the radio.

New York Festivals: What was the turning point in your career?

Jon Tjhia: It was starting Paper Radio in 2010. It really wasn’t that long ago, and it feels ridiculous to think that starting a podcast was novel so recently, but it changed a lot for me.

Making creative and business decisions, answering to and for yourselves … I developed a taste for independence that I get really restless without. But the main reason it was a turning point for me was because of how much I had to learn all at once in order to keep it going, and to correct mistakes I’d made earlier. I can’t stress how stupid I was about so many things to do with radio making, and in so many ways, I still am. I think you’re lucky if your life puts you in a position where you really have no choice but to learn – a lot, and as quickly as you can.

New York  Festivals: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Jon Tjhia: I don’t think any one individual gave me this advice – it was rather absorbed through artists of various persuasions over many years – but the thought that keeps me going is that there are no rules. I know it sounds like a bumper sticker or a souvenir hat slogan, but it’s so important; almost all the rules we live and die by are made up by people. Often, yes, for good reasons. Sometimes not. I think when you’re making creative work, or work that really needs to connect with its audience in a particular way, you owe it to your craft to at least question every rule you meet. That’s about being deliberate.

New York Festivals: What is the responsibility of journalists in today’s world?

Jon Tjhia: I think journalists have always – and should always – have a responsibility to veracity. To me, that’s the fundamental, definitional quality of journalism. (If you don’t, that’s fine! Write your columns, feature articles, scripts … claim whatever the correct title of your profession is. No big deal!) Discern the question, or the questionable thing, and scratch at it. Do they have a responsibility to be entertaining? No! I really don’t think so. If they don’t connect properly to their audiences, though, that’s on editors. Editors really, really matter. Aaaand scene.

New York Festivals: What program do you wish you created?

Jon Tjhia: There are so many things I wish I had made, or at least had a really good peek under the hood of! Some things I keep coming back to include ‘Moving Homes’ by Thomas Meadowcroft (Soundproof), some of those hilarious radio pieces by Chris Morris and Armando Iannucci, and this thing called ‘Between Empathy and Sympathy is Time (Apartheid)’ by artist Terre Thaemlitz. The latter isn’t a radio feature (it’s part of an album and a live multimedia show), but that often makes me wonder what the difference is – why wouldn’t it be? But anyway, there are actually so many producers and artists I’m envious of that it’s sometimes paralyzing. Listeners are totally spoiled for choice.

Lovebomb LP featuring “Between Empathy and Sympathy is Time (Apartheid)” by artist Terre Thaemlitz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York Festivals: What do you think are the hallmarks of award-winning work?

Jon Tjhia: I think there is a perception that award-winning work is often Serious and Worthy, and I think that does often play out. Certainly, there’s incredible value in work that reveals a hidden something, an untold other thing, and it should be recognised. There is work with great implication, or that takes real focus, dedication, rigor and skill. At the same time, I’m most excited by work that delivers an experience that really respects its listeners and brings them somewhere new; that animates them. I’m happiest when I hear stuff that, by design or by accident, feels original and confident and supported by its own internal logic. Some call it personality.

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Awards, please visit:http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/ and for information on the 2018 NYF Radio Awards Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/main.php?p=2,7,15

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Open Mic Spotlight: Kaushik Dutta

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

Kaushik Dutta

2018 Grand Jury member, Kaushik Dutta is a consultant for Radio City 91.1 FM India. He  brings over 10 years of radio industry experience to the jury panel. Kaushik began his radio career as a radio jockey for Radio Mirchi in 2008. He free-lanced as a content creator, sound designer, as well as promo creation and more for over a year before moving on to Radio City as a consultant. He has contributed his expertise for the past 8 years in both show production and station sound for India’s leading radio network.

New York Festivals: What was the turning point in your career?

Kaushik Dutta:  I used to work for a British call center at Gurgaon (a satellite town near the capital, New Delhi). While traveling back from office, in the cab I saw a newspaper ad for a vacancy of a Radio Jockey at a local radio station. After quite some time, they called me for an internship and after that there was no looking back. That newspaper ad was the turning point of my career.

New York Festivals:What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Kaushik Dutta: An Indian Radio Veteran once said to me, “Kaushik you cannot fake it on Radio, you will sound exactly what you are, on air. Your station is, WHAT YOU ARE. So don’t complicate it with figures (are you the no.1 or not). For doing honest radio, you have to be honest with your thoughts.

New York Festivals: Where do you see the industry moving in the next 5 years?

Kaushik Dutta: A lot of times radio professionals feel insecure about the future of radio. But in the process of feeling insecure they forget a basic thing. That radio transmits through air. So till the time this planet is supported by the atmosphere, Radio is going to stay. And in the next five years, we will see a lot of competition from the digital space, but then the same thing happened when Apple launched the iPod but today those devices are not even in the remotest corners of your store room.

New York Festivals:What is the responsibility of journalists in today’s world?

Kaushik Dutta: I have a single sentence answer to this question, “a journalist just needs to REPORT, a journalist is not a storyteller”.

If you like to narrate stories, please write a book, don’t be a journalist.

 

 

New York Festivals: What do you think are the hallmarks of award-winning work?

Kaushik Dutta: Honesty! And that is it. You cannot fake it on radio. Do the work that you are doing with conviction and honesty and awards will follow.

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Awards, please visit:http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/ and for information on the 2018 NYF Radio Awards Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/main.php?p=2,7,15

 

 

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Open Mic Spotlight: Sue Zizza

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

Sue Zizza, Executive Producer/Director/Writer

2018 Grand Jury member, Sue Zizza is the owner of SueMedia Productions, a full-service audio production company based on Long Island in New York. She is an audio producer, director, writer, and sound designer as well as an adjunct member of the Tisch Film School. Sue is also the Program Chair  of the HEAR Now Festival, which helps to celebrate audio fiction productions annually in June. (www.hearnowfestival.org)

For more than 25 years she has been producing award-winning audio drama for public radio and audio-books as well as sound for other entertainment media. Her many productions have earned her numerous Audie, Gracie, Wilbur, Communicator, Ear Phone, NY International Radio, Golden Reel, and many other awards.

New York Festivals: How did you get your start in the radio industry?

Sue Zizza: I began my career as a freshman really, at then Hofstra College’s student station WVHC. Because of my freshman training, I was hired part-time by local Long Island radio stations. In particular my news work at WHLI really helped me hone my radio writing skills.

Working on air all through college at both student and commercial stations gave me a unique opportunity to study and practice my skills.

New York Festivals: Did you have a mentor, if so how did they help you achieve your career goals?

Sue Zizza: I did have a mentor who helped me as a student explore the many ways radio / audio can uniquely tell a story. From there I worked in a number of the jobs that used radio, but it wasn’t until I started working in public radio that I found my voice as a producer of audio fiction.

New York Festivals: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Sue Zizza: Try it. Give it your best shot. Have fun telling your tales.

New York Festivals: What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen in the industry?

Sue Zizza: Technology in the studio and for the user. These changes led to podcasting which have led to more voices creating content.

New York Festivals: What three words describe you as a content creator?

Sue Zizza: Artistry, Innovation, Fun.

New York Festivals: What creative projects are next for you?

Sue Zizza: Taking a work of non-fiction, a memoir and producing the material in a “fictional” manner — special project and unique opportunity.

New York Festivals: What do you think are the hallmarks of award-winning work?

Sue Zizza: Serving the story being told while using the medium to its fullest to engage the listener.

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Awards, please visit:http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/ and for information on the 2018 NYF Radio Awards Gala, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/main.php?p=2,7,15

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Open Mic Spotlight: Kim Fox

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

Kim Fox

2018 Grand Jury member, Kim Fox is Associate Professor of Practice, Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, School of Global Affairs and Public Policy,The American University in Cairo.

New York Festivals: How did you get your start in the radio industry?

Kim Fox: In high school I was selected to participate in a program to volunteer once a week at the local radio reading service. I rolled tape on the reel to reel machines of pre-recorded programs and read some announcements.

 

New York Festivals: What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen in the industry?

Kim Fox: Digitization; and it’s good to see terrestrial radio jumping in, but it’s even better to see the podcasting field grow and the opportunities for freelancers in radio to prosper.

New York Festivals: What is the responsibility of journalists in today’s world?

Kim Fox: Be vigilant despite the threats to press freedoms globally; The same tenets as always including seek the truth.

New York Festivals: What program do you wish you created?

Kim Fox: I’m mesmerized by the work of the team at “The Daily.” In particular, the speed at which they turn around the news of the day.

New York Festivals: What is your favorite program that you created and why?

Kim Fox: The Ehky Ya Masr Podcast. The podcast market is filled with talk shows and in some ways the field lacks diverse voices. So I’m making my contribution by creating a narrative nonfiction audio podcast about life in Egypt. It’s not groundbreaking, but it’s adding some much needed diversity.

New York Festivals: Whose work do you admire the most?

Kim Fox: I admire the work of my friends who work in public radio both on the local and national level.

 

New York Festivals: What creative projects are next for you?

Kim Fox: Working on establishing an oral history archive for WIZF “The Wiz” to document the station’s 30+ year history because not much exists in terms of archives.

 

New York Festivals: What do you think are the hallmarks of award-winning work?

Kim Fox: For narrative nonfiction audio: The strength of the story, the structure of the narrative, the quality of the audio

New York Festivals: How has podcasting changed the way you create content and are you creating more of this on-demand content?

Kim Fox: It’s not just that podcasting has changed the game, but the technology that allows you to create a podcast from a mobile device in minutes makes the platform accessible for everyone. For me that means, constantly recording audio vignettes and editing on the fly.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream job?

Kim Fox: To travel the world sharing my knowledge about audio and radio and producing audio content along the way. I’m getting there.

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Awards, please visit:

 

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Open Mic Spotlight: Lilliana Manna

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

Liliana Manna

2018 Grand Jury member, Liliana Manna is a journalist for Radio Rivadavia Argentina. She was the first woman in Argentina radio to be named a writer-broadcaster in the News Service of Radio Belgrano and served as producer on various radio and television programs. Her illustrious career spans 4 decades and Liliana has been honored as one of the 100 personalities of the decade from 1987 to 1997 in the category of Best Producer.

This year, she stepped up to the podium at the 2017 NYF Radio Awards gala to accept the Bronze trophy for “Street Violence: City of Lost Hearts” for Best Human-Interest Story. Throughout her illustrious carer she has earned more than 7 Gold, Silver and Bronze trophies at the New York Festivals International Radio Awards.

(Left to Right) 2017 NYF Radio Awards Bronze trophy winners Liliana Manna and Rosario Lufrano of Radio Rivadavia Argentina

New York Festivals: How did you get your start in the radio industry?

Liliana Manna: I started in 1974 as Editor-News anchor at LR3 Radio Belgrano in Buenos Aires

New York Festivals: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Liliana Manna: The best advice was given to me by the First Woman Journalist in Argentina who dedicated herself to the production of radio and TV programs. She was called Paloma Efrom (Blackie). She said that journalists should never lose their capacity for wonder and that journalism was a job of 25 hours a day.

Palamo Efrom “Blackie”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York Festivals: What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen in the industry?

Liliana Manna: Undoubtedly digital technological advances have precipitated the media industry to look for new formats and new languages. And I believe that in that vortex imposed by these times, quality has been lost in the content offered. They force us to shortly; to think fast and without much analysis. I think that this aspect must be taken into account when evaluating new proposals.

New York Festivals: What three words describe you as a content creator?

Liliana Manna: Commitment. Knowledge. Creativity.

New York Festivals:What is your favorite program that you created and why?

Liliana Manna: My favorite works are the Documentaries that I produced for different radio stations in the last 20 years. All created with the aim of keeping alive the memory and to substantiate allegations of social problems that seriously affect my country (Corruption, femicide, trafficking in persons, labor slavery, etc).


 

New York Festivals: What do you think are the hallmarks of award-winning work?

Liliana Manna: What I hear, it has to cause the formation of images. And that is achieved with creativity when it comes to illustrating the content that is heard: it is essential that the Producer and the Editor agree on the objective.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream job?

Liliana Manna: Work at the BBC in London or at Cadena SER, in Spain producing documentaries.

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Awards, please visit:http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/

 

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Open Mic Spotlight: Diego Cannizzaro

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each Spotlight interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

Diego Cannizzaro

2018 Grand Jury member Diego Cannizzaro is owner and director of DMC STUDIO. He is a multi-award-winning script writer, sound designer, composer and independent radio producer. Since 1995, he has worked at both radio stations and as a radio producer creating an unmistakable style through sound.

In 2017  Diego took home the New York Festivals Grand Trophy for his award-winning entry “Blackout” the story from the POV of a blind individual and his ability to move around the city and enjoy life through sound.

Throughout “Blackout” the hero of the story shares the sonorous beauty of Buenos Aires, something that not everyone can perceive.

 

New York Festivals: How did you get start in the radio industry?

Diego Cannizzaro: My story with the radio connects through my mother. In the year 1987 it was the first time that I get myself in a radio station. She was a producer of a rock radio called Rock and Pop. There on the radio … she spent hours and hours and so do I.

After so many years, between so much music, cassettes and the first Walkmans, the rock and the pop of end of the 80s, the arrival of vinyls from New York, the radios of the world, I decided to study music, sound and radio as well.

Then in the year 1997 approximately I started working as an air technician in different radio stations of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

New York Festivals: What was the turning point in your career?

Diego Cannizzaro: The point was without a doubt, when I decided to produce my own scripts, my own stories. Write them, record them, produce them and edit them and put them on the air.

It was a hard road, I became independent, and I tried to get well know radios to call me to produce the art of their identifying sound.

With effort and creativity, I managed to have my own studio that today finally became DMC STUDIO based in Argentina, where today, it is the production center of all the pieces that we do for local radios as well as for TV, cinema and social media.

New York Festivals: Did you have a mentor, if you so how did they help you achieve your career goals

Diego Cannizzaro: I do have. But in reality it is not just one person. Speaking chronologically, I think I should name Guillermo Garcia and Alberto Chinen, who were sources of inspiration in the early days or my career in the technical area as an air operator. They were the ones who pushed me and encouraged me to go further with just one tool: Sounds.

Then I met Santiago Pont Lezica, radio director who gave me the opportunity to become an artistic editor. Next with the texts and the voice of Jesus Quintero, unconsciously while I was doing a technical work, I developed without realizing a script style that developed and flourished some time later.

Mario Pergolini

Finally, I must name Mario Pergolini, one of the well know of the Argentine radio presenters from 1988 till this days , with whom I worked with him for more than 15 years in different projects mainly in radio, but also in TV, internet and cinema.

New York Festivals: What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen in the industry?

Diego Cannizzaro: Undoubtedly, social networks have impacted on all the economic and creative aspects of all types of projects.

From DMC STUDIO, we adapt and our productions also do it. Producing for radio is not the same as for social media. That affects us in the duration, in the costs even technically, since some platforms reproduce sound in mono or depend on the streaming for the quality of the audio and video. So, we need to put an eye there.

This generates in us a challenge and drives us to create new content with the best possible quality for different social media, or conventional as Radio and TV.

New York Festivals: What three words describe you as a content creator?

Diego Cannizzaro: Dreamer. Obsessive. Sensitive.

New York Festivals: What program do you wish you created?

Diego Cannizzaro: Or the one that I am doing at that moment. Or at this time.
The show that I would like to create, is the one I did not do yet. The one that rests in my imagination. When I’m creating it either at the time of the script, or when I’m recording it, or when I’m composing their music or designing their sound, the show is that show, but once it’s finished, it’s the next one again.

It is a suffocating feeling, but at the same time it is an inner force that drives me to generate more content. I hope that that feeling never ceases to exist.

New York Festivals: What creative projects are next for you?

Diego Cannizzaro

Diego Cannizzaro: This year we are focused on DMC STUDIO, deepen sound production for radio, both technically and artistically.

Personally I have been in the market for several years and I urgently need the radio sound to change. That radically changes and generate a call for attention in each piece that we produce in my studio.

For this we have new equipment and a strict control of the way of seeing and saying things, that is, selecting new words, trying to synthesize ideas as best as possible, giving everything in a new way.

In parallel, I’m also preparing my new sound documentary-podcast, to premiere very soon. While I can not say much about what this new piece is about, what I can say is that I have decided to record in different places of the world for this opportunity.

I have decided to go in search of sounds now more than ever original, because with internet anyone can produce something. I think that at that point technology has made us very passive and lazy. Therefore, if the script that I am writing tells me that we need a sound from Italy, or from Colombia, then we have to go for it to capture it and invite it to be a part.

I continue to defend the originality and the quality of the sound pieces and so that we can have outstanding radio products worthy of being heard and rewarded.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream job?

Diego Cannizzaro: I think my dream job is this same one that I have. I’m lucky.

Every day I realize this and I feel grateful. It is very important for me to do what I do, to work on the radio, to manipulate sounds, to play with the words I find fascinating.

When I write a script, it seems like a dream and with it, I go back to my childhood, I dream again like when I was a kid and they read me stories when going to sleep. Now those stories, I keep telling them in a low voice, for me.

Although it turns out that later, those stories come true. They are played by an actor. Then they have real music and sounds, but of course, they are only real when we play them and listen to them.

I can also say, that I dream of some day working for a radio station, maybe in New York or in Europe or Asia. It would be very interesting for me to develop programs in another environment and culture.

For more information about New York Festivals Radio Program Awards, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/

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Open Mic Spotlight: Havoc Franklin

NYF’s Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

Havoc Franklin

2018 Grand Jury member Havoc Franklin is Radio Manager for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Canada, he brings over 30 years of radio industry experience to the judging panel. Previously he was  director of local program development for CBC Radio and working within the senior radio management group.

 

New York Festivals: What was the turning point in your career?

Havoc Franklin: The turning point in my career happened during the second week in my first job. I was asked to direct the live news/current affairs morning show at my station (having never directed a live show before or for that matter any show before). It was during that week that I realized what I wanted to do and what I felt I could contribute to society. That excitement, that desire to explore, that access to all levels of society and being part of that live entity had and still has an irresistible draw and purpose.

New York Festivals: What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

Havoc Franklin: Be open to ideas.

New York Festivals: What is the responsibility of journalists in today’s world?

Havoc Franklin: I think that the responsibility of a journalist today is essentially the same as the responsibility of a journalist 50 years ago. True treatments, platforms, complexities, speed, revenue models have changed but at the heart of all good journalism is research, integrity, drive to find out and ability to communicate so that it connects and resonates with audiences. The role and responsibility of a journalist in a democratic society is just as significant today as it was before. That independence, that freedom to ask without fear of repercussion or death is still at the heart of a journalist’s role.

New York Festivals: How has podcasting changed the way you create content and are you creating more of this on-demand content?

Havoc Franklin: Audiences, individuals still have a strong desire to connect to the human voice and ideas, so in that sense podcasting has not changed the underlying intent. What podcasting has changed is opening up treatments, potential to reach niche communities, and access.

The treatments are heard closer to the ear and therefore can open up an even richer audio experience. The content can be heard at any time and reheard with ease and individual choice. The platform has catapulted the relationship of the host, interviewer, speaker to the individual listening to new levels and authenticity.

In the past year or so we have spent more time and effort looking at podcasts for local communities so that has changed how we connect with communities we don’t necessarily connect with in our terrestrial or streaming programming.

I think because of these new podcast treatments and influences of other treatments on line (video)  it has pushed presentation values on our live programming.

New York Festivals: What would be your dream job?

Havoc Franklin: I am in my dream job. I am involved in the work that early in my career I imagined, if I was lucky, I would be a part of.  I work in program and content development for existing and new programs for a public broadcaster. It is positive and forward looking.  I learn from my colleague every day and enjoy the shared atmosphere of intent and collaboration.  The work has challenge, variety and you can see success.

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Program Awards, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/

 

 

 

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Open Mic Spotlight: Jeff Kirkwood

Open Mic Spotlight spends a few minutes each week with prominent Grand Jury members from around the globe, each interview shares the insights of content creators from the wonderful world of radio.

New York Festivals International Radio Awards jury of award-winning directors, producers, journalists, writers, actors, creative directors, composers, on-air talent, and programming executives are actively involved in creating the innovative content on radio today.

2018 Grand Jury member, Jeff Kirkwood is production manager for BELL Media (formerly CHUM) since July 2002 and is now managing a total of 7 stations including 104.5 CHUMFM, 999fm-Virgin Radio, Newstalk1010, TSN 1050/Country105/Energy997/919 BOBFM.

Jeff started his tenure at CHUM in Toronto on October 12, 1985 as an on-air producer. By March of 1989 he was promoted to commercial producer.

Throughout his career he has racked up numerous major awards including a total of 14 from New York Festivals (including 2 Gold and 2 Grand Awards), 2 IBA awards (including 1 Gold) and a Gold Award from the Crystal Awards here in Canada.

 

New York Festivals: How did you get your start in the radio industry?

Jeff Kirkwood: I started in radio while in grade 12 in 1982. I took a co-op course that placed students at different “agencies” around town based on the student’s top 3 selections from available placements. I really wanted to be a TV cameraman, so I applied at the local cable station. My second choice was the local radio station and I honestly don’t remember my third choice. The TV station was only accepting 2 students and 13 applied.  I was told in my interview I “wasn’t the media type”. I still don’t know what that means, and she couldn’t give me an answer “I know it when I see it and you aren’t it” I was told. What a great confidence boost to a 17-year-old (there’s that sarcasm again). When I interviewed at the radio station I was one of only 2 students that applied, and I got the “gig” because I had a car and the other student didn’t. The concern was the nearest bus stop was a considerable distance and they needed to know for sure that the student would show up every day. My first day was October 1, 1982 and was actually hired as a paid employee in January of 1983.

New York Festivals: What was the turning point in your career?

Jeff Kirkwood: After 3 years at the small radio station I started at and applying to bigger stations for 2 ½ of those years, I was hired at 1050 CHUM in Toronto. That started my career path to becoming a real producer. CHUM knew my goal was to work on commercials (and eventually promos and station imaging) and they pointed my duties in that direction. I was promoted to commercial producer in 1989 and never looked back. In 1997 I was made Imaging Producer for CHUMFM and eventually Production Manager in 2002.

New York Festivals: What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen in the industry?

Jeff Kirkwood: The single biggest change I’ve seen has been the changes in CRTC regulation allowing multiple ownership in individual markets. Put it this way: in 1985 I was hired to work at 1 radio station, 1050CHUM. When I became a commercial producer, I worked for 2 stations, 1050CHUM and CHUMFM. I’m now the Production Manager of 7 stations and 3 of them are in markets 2 hours away. And that may very well change within the next little while to include as many as 4 additional stations.

New York Festivals: What do you think are the hallmarks of award-winning work?

Jeff Kirkwood: To win awards, first and foremost the work must be relatable to the audience. If they don’t get it or don’t care, then it’s over. Obviously, it must be well-produced, well-written, well edited, top-notch voice talent, make smart music choices and it must be memorable. If listeners don’t remember the message, then what’s the point. Using studio gimmicks for the sake of using them makes no sense to me. As a producer your job is to ensure you are serving the client or program to the best of your ability.

For more information on New York Festivals Radio Program Awards, please visit: http://www.newyorkfestivals.com/radio/.

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